22,599 reputation
45492
bio website
location Cologne, Germany
age 35
visits member for 4 years, 9 months
seen 16 hours ago

Real name: Christian Lercher

Started programming when I was 7 years old (Basic on C64, then Assembler, later C/C++, and now mostly Java).

First Windows experience: ca 1993 (Win 3.11)

First Unix experience: 1998 (Solaris, then SuSE Linux, now mostly Debian/Ubuntu and Mac OS X).

I'm just as much interested in technical things, as in social topics, and economics. It really depends.


Dec
15
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
3
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
4
comment Jersey Client non-blocking
In the end, I went with Apache's HttpAsyncClient (I also tried AsyncHttpClient as suggested by @Alper, which also works great - just little differences). As far as I can see, the current versions of Jersey cannot deliver nonblocking behavior, because it is limited by JAX-RS 2.0 (a few places mention, that this might become possible with JAX-RS 3.0)
Nov
4
accepted Jersey Client non-blocking
Oct
3
comment Jersey Client non-blocking
@EJP: BTW, the 2048 limit I see seems to be enforced by Mac OS X: sysctl kern.num_taskthreads shows kern.num_taskthreads: 2048 - and it seems, that the Oracle JVM actually uses kernel threads (interesting).
Oct
3
comment Jersey Client non-blocking
@EJP: Thanks, I corrected the question.
Oct
3
revised Jersey Client non-blocking
added 29 characters in body
Oct
3
comment Jersey Client non-blocking
Using my own ThreadPool doesn't really solve the problem: If the ThreadPool is bounded, and I use sync calls to Jersey, then the callers to the executor will block. If I use async calls to Jersey, then Jersey unfortunately creates its own threads (not just workers, but one per open request)... (the only thing that could maybe work, would be to use sync calls, and then kill my thread - but that feels like a very bad idea.)
Oct
2
comment Jersey Client non-blocking
I just found, that there is jersey-non-blocking-client, and a corresponding blog post, where the author addresses the problem (though he seriously underestimates the impact of non-blocking vs blocking). However, unfortunately the project is for an old version of Jersey, which I cannot use. Maybe newer versions of Jersey already come with non-blocking support? And if yes, how to activate it?
Oct
2
comment Jersey Client non-blocking
(I deleted my previous comment, I had made a mistake) Yes, AsyncHttpClient does it right - it creates a worker thread pool, and can deal with much more active requests than workers. However, it would be quite a lot of effort to rework our application to use AsyncHttpClient, as we use a lot of Jersey features... wouldn't it be possible to achieve the same with Jersey?
Oct
1
revised Jersey Client non-blocking
edited tags
Oct
1
asked Jersey Client non-blocking
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
24
comment Clarifications about nodetool repair -pr
@catpaws: Thanks, both your comments contain some very valuable information (which is in fact not in the 2.0 documentation)!
Sep
24
asked Clarifications about nodetool repair -pr
Sep
15
comment Easy way to start a standalone JNDI server (and register some resources)
@EJP: The name "JNDI server" is not very precise indeed. However, what I meant back then (over 3 years ago...), was a server that can be accessed by a JNDI client (I didn't care about which one, as long as it allows me to bind the object in a way, that the client can read it. The notion of a "JNDI server" was mostly derived from c3p0's mentioning of "JNDI-based naming services".)
Aug
18
answered GWT - RPC equivalent of “ServiceLayerDecorator.invoke(Method domainMethod, Object… args)”
Aug
7
comment Session handling during login with protection against XSRF (cross-site-request-forgery) in GWT
@Niklas: This is true, if it is possible to display sensitive information without sending the XSRF token. Some people make the following mistake: They XSRF-protect only those calls that can change something on the server. That's actually mostly ok, but for reasons like the one you mentioned, and also for the reason I mentioned at the bottom of my answer, it is much better to also protect the calls which retrieve sensitive data.