Eric Postpischil

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seen Feb 22 at 12:43

Senior software engineer in Apple’s Vector and Numerics Group.


Jun
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
24
awarded  linux
Apr
4
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
21
awarded  Yearling
Feb
23
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
22
awarded  Constituent
Feb
22
comment In C++ are all names essentialy “under-the-hood” pointers?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: No, because the object model of storage is described in the C standard and the C++ standard. Any particular implementation might implement object accesses and modifications with whatever means, usually hardware addresses but also various data structures in an interpreted implementation. An identifier could be, at run-time, literally a string of characters that is used to look up the object in a map. But that is an implementation detail. In the C++ model of computation, an object is represented by bytes in storage, and an identifier for it refers to that storage.
Feb
22
comment In C++ are all names essentialy “under-the-hood” pointers?
@LightnessRacesinOrbits: The tags mean “about C” or “involves C”, not just “strictly inside C”, and similarly for C++. This question explicitly asks about “under”. Asking how something works “under the hood” is a question about the workings underneath the facade.
Feb
22
comment In C++ are all names essentialy “under-the-hood” pointers?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Only if you interpret the answers as making statements about C or C++ semantics, which they clearly are not. The question is about the workings under the hood. Stack Overflow is overbalanced toward insisting that programmers live completely inside the semantics of one programming language or another and not learn about the machinery that makes those languages work.
Feb
22
comment In C++ are all names essentialy “under-the-hood” pointers?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: The question does not ask about in the C++ model; it asks about under the hood.
Feb
22
comment In C++ are all names essentialy “under-the-hood” pointers?
The question does not ask whether num creates a pointer but whether it is a pointer “under the hood”. So the answer is, yes, in the C++ model, the name is largely a way of referring to the bytes in memory (in the C++ computation model). An access to the object, if not optimized away, does operate by loading or storing using the address of the object.
Feb
21
comment random() function only spitting out big numbers
@MartinParkin: It is not equal because the span of numbers returned by random is not usually a multiple of the desired span. On top of that, all the excess values are mapped to the low end of the destination interval, skewing the distribution. And, on top of that, common (but poor) generators have low randomness in their low bits, and taking a remainder modulo a multiple of a power of two inherits those low bits.
Feb
21
comment Macro to shorten a struct member reference in C
Identifiers may also contain the universal character names listed in C 2011 D.1 and other implementation-defined characters. But that will not help the OP.
Feb
21
revised Two’s complement of a fraction
Fix spelling and other language issues.
Feb
21
revised What does this pointer between parentheses mean?
added 9 characters in body
Feb
21
answered What does this pointer between parentheses mean?
Feb
21
answered How to zero an array of pointers