Tom Barta

Unregistered less info
626 reputation
43
bio website tombarta.wordpress.com
location
age
visits member for 5 years, 11 months
seen Nov 26 '08 at 3:53

Jul
4
awarded  Yearling
Jan
13
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
10
awarded  Yearling
Feb
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
22
awarded  Yearling
Nov
26
answered Which is faster - C# unsafe code or raw C++
Nov
20
comment How do you convert a C++ string to an int?
atoi() also ignores leading whitespace and trailing crap, so it may succeed where other more strict parsers will fail. Depending on your POV, that could be an advantage or a hindrance.
Nov
20
comment How do you convert a C++ string to an int?
atoi() does other magic... like ignoring leading whitespace, ignoring trailing non-whitespace, and assuming "0" is a valid error condition as well. Please only use atoi() when you really don't care about validity. Otherwise, strtod() in C and std::istringstream in C++.
Nov
20
comment What is the difference between using #include<filename> and #include<filename.h> in c++
Even if they're deprecated, no sane compiler vender will ever deprecate the usage of filename.h in C++. They'd break far too many programs and angry far too many customers/developers.
Nov
7
answered How can I improve/replace sprintf, which I've measured to be a performance hotspot?
Nov
7
comment Portably handle exceptional errors in C++
The OP is looking for something to address lower-level exceptional conditions than C++ language-level exceptions. In a POSIX world, this means installing signal handlers for (most) everything. In MSVC, the __try/__catch mechanism handles similar faults (including the Win32 equivalent of SEGFAULT)
Nov
6
answered How do I find the file handles that my process has opened in Linux?
Nov
6
answered defensive coding practices
Nov
6
comment defensive coding practices
in many cases a unit test is written before the implementation. Yes, it is a coding practice.
Nov
6
comment Do I need a semaphore when reading from a global structure?
I don't think you understand what the OP was asking about. He's referring to variables that aren't written at all (after program startup, presumably). In your example, seconds/minutes/hours all refer to writeable variables, so of course you need synchronization primitives.
Oct
30
answered Double Negation in C++ code
Oct
23
answered Extending an existing class like a namespace (C++)?
Oct
23
answered Adding Boost makes Debug build depend on “non-D” MSVC runtime DLLs
Oct
21
awarded  Teacher