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Author of Wide language.

Foo


Mar
5
answered So we can use virtual functions with objects allocated on stack?
Mar
2
comment Initialize read only array only once
This is truly terrible code. Not only do you use terrifically unsafe native arrays and obscenely confusing array-to-pointer-decay, but it's just got to be a mutable global too...
Mar
1
comment Why is the SIZE constant only @Native for Integer and Long?
The most likely answer is that they experimented with changing the sizes for int and long, but not the other types.
Mar
1
comment Difference between an allocator and a built in array in c++?
@TheParamagneticCroissant: I think that you're misreading the question. He's pointing out that new string[7] could be written in terms of the allocator interface, and he's right.
Mar
1
answered Difference between an allocator and a built in array in c++?
Mar
1
comment c++ unless wrapper construct for flow control
There's a large mile of difference between a function pointer and std::function. As in, a function pointer is the new and delete of the "Store a function" world.
Mar
1
comment c++ unless wrapper construct for flow control
It's the "or std::function" part that's important. Also, it's only really conventional where X is very large or dynamic.
Mar
1
comment c++ unless wrapper construct for flow control
Well, strictly speaking, they are a control flow mechanism, it's just best kept external
Mar
1
comment c++ unless wrapper construct for flow control
Function pointers? srsly?
Mar
1
answered c++ unless wrapper construct for flow control
Mar
1
comment inheriting from shared_ptr<void>
@amin: It's undefined behaviour, regardless of whether or not free actually gets called.
Mar
1
answered inheriting from shared_ptr<void>
Mar
1
comment inheriting from shared_ptr<void>
@amin: Don't ever use new T[]. Ever.
Feb
28
comment Use template to apply a function template
@pqnet: They are. But they cannot express templated functions or overload sets, which is what the OP wants. By the time you've gotten a function pointer, you've lost the desired behaviour.
Feb
28
comment Use template to apply a function template
@pqnet: std::function can only take function objects in the constructor.
Feb
28
comment Use template to apply a function template
No, there is not. You are trying to treat functions in C++ like they are function objects, and they are not. They are shitty C function pointers and require a bunch of casting and explicit arguments if you want to try to convert a template/overload set to a function pointer. You must use function objects if you want the good stuff. If you only have the original increment, then you're fucked in as far as having nice syntax and generic code goes. The best you can do is wrap it in a lambda (polylambda if you're lucky) and use that.
Feb
28
comment Use template to apply a function template
@Praxeolitic: apply and increment don't know or give a shit about each other here. apply can take any lambda or function object.
Feb
28
answered Use template to apply a function template
Feb
28
answered Is subtracting larger unsigned value from smaller in C++ undefined behaviour?
Feb
28
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