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Author of Wide language.

Foo


3h
comment How to change sdcard's cid number?
The link is the only relevant part of this answer and link-only unacceptable.
7h
comment Total glibc malloc() bytes
Nice, er, "C++" HERE.
8h
comment Preferred way of initialization in c++11
Initializer lists and uniform init are two totally separate features, and the problems that occur when they interact are the primary reason for avoiding uniform initialization.
1d
comment What's an iterator?
@EdHeal: cplusplus.com bad go away bad boy stop it
1d
comment C++ - Accessing multiple object's interfaces via a single pointer
The primary downside of this is that FlyingSwimmingThing cannot be re-used to create WalkingSwimmingThing and FlyingWalkingThing.
1d
comment C++ - Accessing multiple object's interfaces via a single pointer
@Nemo: Your technique requires defining a new FlyingSwimmingThing every time, and doesn't allow access to the original Flying* or Swimming*. It's definitely suboptimal.
1d
comment c++11 how to use reference in vector?
There is nothing inherently wrong with using a vector of raw pointers. Just don't try to delete the contents. Raw pointers are perfectly useful and practical tools, not every reference needs to own the pointee.
2d
comment Get advantages of an universal reference, without an universal reference
Eh, just move it to the top one.
2d
comment Preferred way of initialization in c++11
Correct me if I'm wrong, but int i = {0} and int i = {0.0} are clearly different things.
2d
comment Preferred way of initialization in c++11
This is too broad... it's basically a survey. There is no definitive answer just yet.
2d
comment Preferred way of initialization in c++11
Welcome to initializer-list/uniform initialization hell.
2d
comment Preferred way of initialization in c++11
So is free, and that's insane to use.
2d
comment C++ - Accessing multiple object's interfaces via a single pointer
@Jack: It's not decoupled at all because the definer of the class has to know about all of the composing interfaces, and inherit from them all, in advance. Probably involving a bunch of virtual inheritance too.
2d
comment C++ - Accessing multiple object's interfaces via a single pointer
No, he wants to store any object that implements two interfaces independently.
2d
comment C++ - Accessing multiple object's interfaces via a single pointer
That doesn't produce the same result, because you have to manually define a new class every time and then every derived class has to know about that new class ahead of time. You can't just compose two interfaces and get a new interface that is the composition of those two. You can only define a completely new interface, which happens to include two existing ones.
2d
comment C++ - Accessing multiple object's interfaces via a single pointer
He doesn't want to do it with different interfaces; he just wants to compose two interfaces.
2d
comment Is modifying a mutable on a const declared object undefined behavior?
Nope, it's perfectly legit.
2d
comment Is modifying a mutable on a const declared object undefined behavior?
They are, but you can only mutate them directly in situ, as they cannot bind to a mutable reference. This is what leads to the "rvalues are const" myth that's popular. Something like std::vector<int>().push_back(5); is perfectly legal C++03.
2d
comment Unable to compile FreeRDP source code on Ubuntu
This is not a website for guidance. This is a terrible question.
2d
comment Is modifying a mutable on a const declared object undefined behavior?
You don't need handleImpl, the rvalue ref overload can delegate freely to the lvalue ref one.