177,242 reputation
29239399
bio website StackOverflow.Com/users/2988
location Karlsruhe, Germany
age 36
visits member for 6 years, 7 months
seen 3 hours ago

Not a software developer in the sense that I write software as part of my job or otherwise get paid to do so. Also, not a developer in the sense that I write software for others.

I write software for myself, often for no other reason than that I want to. (What I call recreational programming.)

Actually, I’m currently forcibly confined to recreational programming, as I’m looking for a job.

My current go-to language is Ruby, but I’m interested in all sorts of other languages as well: Newspeak, Seph, Ioke, Self, Io, Slate, Reia, Cobra, Fortress, Sapphire, Haskell, Scala, Clojure, Racket, Go, Fancy, Poison, and many more.


6h
comment Ruby - passing by value or by reference
C# also works like this by default for reference types. C# has both reference and value types and both pass-by-value and pass-by-reference, but the "default" (i.e. no use of the ref keyword and an instance of a class rather than a struct) mode is the same as Ruby. Scala's is the same as Java, except that it also supports call-by-name for individual parameters. Haskell is pure, so the difference between pass-by-value and pass-by-reference actually cannot be observed, so you simply don't know which of the two it is (and in fact, compilers use both depending on what is faster).
6h
answered Category of object-orientation in Ruby
1d
comment Why do people use nested notation for modules rather than :: syntax?
Exactly, they are not equivalent, so they are not interchangeable. They have different lexical scopes, and constants are looked up first lexically, then by inheritance.
2d
comment Ruby quickly see what fields are in an object
There is no such thing as a "field" in Ruby. Please clarify what exactly you are looking for. If you are talking about what Java calls a "field", then the equivalent in Ruby would be "instance variable", and that is not what the answer shows you.
Mar
25
comment Why can't I use `filename.open' instead of `open(filename)'?
What makes you think that the String class should be responsible for managing access to the filesystem? Or even know about what a filesystem is?
Mar
25
comment Ruby to C# conversion, assigning to an array indexed by range
Yeah, array slicing doesn't care about the contents of the range (which in this particular case is just empty), only the start and endpoint. Makes sense, but is non-obvious.
Mar
25
comment Ruby to C# conversion, assigning to an array indexed by range
If there is something particularly unclear about the documentation of Array#[]=, I'm sure the Ruby team would be happy to know about it!
Mar
24
comment “./” doesn't work in command prompt e.g. “./bin/spark-shell”
The path separator on Windows is backslash, not /. And there is no syntax for referring to the current directory. This question doesn't belong on StackOverflow. SO is for programming questions, but "how do I run a program on Windows" is not a programming question, that's just Windows user 101, and thus belongs on SuperUser.
Mar
24
comment Base class constraint on generic class specifying the class itself
Isn't this just F-bounded Polymorphism?
Mar
24
comment Ruby version for Multithreading
Or JRuby. Or use 4 processes instead of threads. Or, depending on what you mean by "searching", the code would be implemented in C and run in parallel even on YARV and MRI. Or, you are mostly doing I/O, which is asynchronous and concurrent even on MRI and YARV.
Mar
24
answered Ruby version for Multithreading
Mar
24
comment Instance variable access in Ruby
There is no difference between instance variables and class instance variables, because there is no such thing as a class instance variable. Classes are objects just like any other object, thus, they can have instance variables just like any other object. There's nothing special or different about that.
Mar
23
comment Why is `/` not allowed in regex pattern after `#`?
@Cary: "until the end of the line" for me means "until the end of the line", not "until the end of the line or a Regexp delimiter". Changing the behavior would probably be complicated since AFAIK right now the parsers treat Regexp literals as black boxes and leave the parsing to the Regexp engine. So, clarifying the docs seems the more sensible option.
Mar
23
comment Why is `/` not allowed in regex pattern after `#`?
@Stefan: Uh, sorry, I missed that. Then it's definitely a bug, either in the docs or the parser.
Mar
23
comment Why is `/` not allowed in regex pattern after `#`?
@Stefan: Only in code. But not inside a String literal, for example, nor in a Regexp literal. In a String or Regexp literal, it's just a character.
Mar
23
comment Find user ip address by email address
I didn't mean to imply that you tagged the question wrongly. If what you are asking about were possible, it would be important to know that you want to implement this in Scala within Play, as there might even already be an existing helper in the framework somewhere. I just wanted to point out that it's not a missing feature in Play or lack of functionality in Scala that makes this impossible, but that whoever asked you to implement this, doesn't even understand how email and the Internet work on a very basic level, since this is not just technically impossible but plain non-sensical.
Mar
23
answered How do you delegate class methods to another object in Ruby using the Forwardable Module?
Mar
23
comment Find user ip address by email address
This doesn't really have anything to do with Scala at all. It's just basic Internet 101. There simply is no relation whatsoever between email addresses and IP addresses. Heck, what we know today as "Internet Mail" is actually older than the Internet itself, and thus older than IP, so there cannot possibly be any such relationship.
Mar
22
comment Ruby: How to pass the object name to an array rather than the ID
What is the "name" of an object? Objects don't have names in Ruby. They have an identity, a state and a class, but no names.
Mar
22
comment Last expression evaluated in Ruby
The return value of the method is not meaningless. It will be returned from the method. But assignments always evaluate to the value that is being assigned. So, you can't use assignment syntax to call the method. But you can use public_send, send or __send__.