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1d
comment String word reverse in Java giving wrong result?
You are using a lot of predefined methods and APIs there: length, charAt, println. You are also using predefined operators -, >, --, !=, +. Can you clarify why those are allowed and others are not? And more importantly, what constraints do you have that force you to not be able to use the predefined methods and APIs?
1d
comment call parent constructor in ruby
@alex0112: Yes. You are missing that a constructor is not a method. But all of Class#new, Class#allocate and #initialize are methods. Constructors have special rules about when they are allowed to be called, how they are allowed to be inherited, what they are allowed to contain etc. For example, in Java, constructors must call the parent constructor, and if they don't, that call gets automatically inserted by the compiler.
1d
comment call parent constructor in ruby
@Engr.HasanuzzamanSumon: If there even were something like a "constructor" in Ruby, then it would be Class#allocate, not Class#new. Class#allocate creates a new object. Class#new is simply a convenience method calls Class#allocate and then #initialize.
1d
comment What's happens in Ruby and Python? Why the variable wil be nil in if block in ruby ,but undefined in python?
You have two questions here, so you should ask two questions. Actually, you shouldn't, because I know for a fact that the one about Ruby has already been asked and answered, and I strongly suspect that the same is true about the Python question as well.
2d
comment Scala multiple inheritence with Classes
Martin Odersky said that Scala doesn't need classes. He has a sketch for a sane initialization ordering algorithm and a sketch for a proof of correctness for that algorithm. Classes are purely for compatibility with the underlying host platform(s).
2d
answered Scala multiple inheritence with Classes
2d
answered Ruby: Implementation of attribute accessors with validation
May
3
comment Scala @tailrec 'Recursive call not in tail positionwith return value
"although this is the last operation in the method" – No, it is not. The last operation is new AndNode or new OrNode, respectively. (Actually, the last operation is the assignment to node, which happens even after that.)
May
3
comment Ruby - deciphering use of :
Feel free to steal ;-) Oh, and thanks for your reply, it reminded me I forgot to upvote.
May
3
comment Ruby - deciphering use of :
Note: this is not criticism of your answer.
May
3
comment Ruby - deciphering use of :
Your example is exactly equivalent to x = if time < '12:00' then 'AM' else 'PM' end. In general, unlike other languages, where if is a statement and the conditional operator is an expression, there is rarely a need to use the conditional operator in Ruby, since if is also an expression (in fact, there are no statements in Ruby). Really, the only difference is brevity (which is not universally a good thing) and precedence, and the precedence of the conditional operator has tripped up quite a few programmers as evidenced by questions about it here on SO.
May
3
comment Why is compilation very slow for scala programs?
For a theoretical answer consider that Scala's type system is Turing-complete, which means that compilation can actually take infinitely long.
May
2
awarded  Guru
May
2
awarded  inheritance
May
2
comment Why are these methods not dynamically defined at runtime by define_method?
Note that the methods do get defined just fine. You defined two methods named self.kite_flying and self.tail_flying. Those are illegal names for methods, but Ruby won't stop you from defining them, and you can still call them using reflection: foo = Dynamic.new; foo.send(:'self.kite_flying', nil, nil) # hello some dynamic kite_flying. You can also see that they are defined: Dynamic.public_instance_methods(false).grep(/flying/) # => [:'self.kite_flying', :'self.tail_flying'].
May
2
comment ruby inheritence failure I can't undertand
The error message says the exact opposite: it says that an argument was passed were none was expected, not the other way round.
May
2
answered ruby inheritence failure I can't undertand
May
1
comment Understand Float “method” from book “Programming Ruby”
There are several questions here on SO about that, I believe. Foo is always a constant, Foo(), Foo bar and bar.Foo are always methods, simply because constants can't have receivers or arguments.
May
1
comment Understand Float “method” from book “Programming Ruby”
The reason why you can call Kernel.Float is not because Float is a method of Kernel. At least not directly. Kernel is an instance of Module, Module is a subclass of Object, Object includes Kernel, so the reason why you can call Kernel.Float is not because Float is a method of Kernel, it's because Kernel is an instance of Kernel.
May
1
comment Understand Float “method” from book “Programming Ruby”
No. Constants can't take arguments, only methods can. Ruby will never look for a constant if you pass an argument. It knows it's a method because it has arguments.