582 reputation
519
bio website cplusplus.com
location New Orleans, LA
age 19
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen May 26 '13 at 8:58
A newcomer to C++ and programming in general

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Oct
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awarded  Popular Question
Oct
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Nice Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Citizen Patrol
Nov
5
comment How do I save the character occupying a certain space in curses?
I understand that, but I want to try this my way right now: printing the output and switching the characters as the player navigates. When it gets complex enough that I need to store the state of the entire room, I'll start doing that.
Nov
5
comment How do I save the character occupying a certain space in curses?
Thank you, looks like exactly what I need!
Nov
5
accepted How do I save the character occupying a certain space in curses?
Nov
5
asked How do I save the character occupying a certain space in curses?
Nov
3
accepted Is std::string a better idea than char* when you're going to have to pass it as a char*?
Nov
3
comment Is std::string a better idea than char* when you're going to have to pass it as a char*?
So, for personal clarification: your recommendation would be to use the vector as a substitute for char*, copying it to a string when (if?) I need any string-based methods?
Nov
3
comment Is std::string a better idea than char* when you're going to have to pass it as a char*?
I see. So using vector<char> is the same as char* as far as the function is concerned, but with some of C++'s added safety?
Nov
3
comment Is std::string a better idea than char* when you're going to have to pass it as a char*?
I've been told not to mix input/output from different sources (in this case, iostreams and curses) - is that not true? Also, as far as I'm aware, a vector<char> can't grow as the function reads into it, because these functions expect fixed-length char arrays; so is there any real advantage to using a vector?