Reputation
627
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
1 8 21
Impact
~35k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 714 votes cast
Nov
5
comment How do I save the character occupying a certain space in curses?
I understand that, but I want to try this my way right now: printing the output and switching the characters as the player navigates. When it gets complex enough that I need to store the state of the entire room, I'll start doing that.
Nov
5
comment How do I save the character occupying a certain space in curses?
Thank you, looks like exactly what I need!
Nov
3
comment Is std::string a better idea than char* when you're going to have to pass it as a char*?
So, for personal clarification: your recommendation would be to use the vector as a substitute for char*, copying it to a string when (if?) I need any string-based methods?
Nov
3
comment Is std::string a better idea than char* when you're going to have to pass it as a char*?
I see. So using vector<char> is the same as char* as far as the function is concerned, but with some of C++'s added safety?
Nov
3
comment Is std::string a better idea than char* when you're going to have to pass it as a char*?
I've been told not to mix input/output from different sources (in this case, iostreams and curses) - is that not true? Also, as far as I'm aware, a vector<char> can't grow as the function reads into it, because these functions expect fixed-length char arrays; so is there any real advantage to using a vector?
Oct
30
comment What's the point of function prototyping?
Why are people closing this as an exact duplicate? The other question is asking if it's required. This one is asking why one would ever use it at all. Just cause they both have the word prototype in the title doesn't mean they're the same question.
Oct
29
comment What's the point of function prototyping?
I don't see why. I'm not asking if they're necessary, I just don't understand why they're in the standard in the first place.
Oct
28
comment Is there any way to pass a std::string to a function that accepts a char* and changes its contents?
Ohh, right, I'd heard about the benefits of strncat over strcat, but because I'm so used to C++ iostreams I'd never had to worry about it til now. Thanks for the tip!
Oct
27
comment Is there any way to pass a std::string to a function that accepts a char* and changes its contents?
Changes its contents as in potentially changing the length, yes.
Oct
27
comment Is there any way to pass a std::string to a function that accepts a char* and changes its contents?
vector<char> can be substituted for a char*?
Jul
28
comment How can I count in a different number base in C++?
I thought setbase() could only be used with base-8, -10 and -16?
Jul
17
comment OK, so I'm not a beginner anymore. What comes next?
This was a bit of an eye-opener for me. I'm in pretty much the same position as the questioner, and I've been stagnating ever since I stopped constantly learning. I assumed the next step was to program some console games, which seemed cool at first but isn't retaining my interest. Only now do I realize that, and it's time for me to take a new direction with programming. :D ... of course, I still have to figure out which direction that is, but I'm sure that'll come with time.
Jul
14
comment Why does C++ use pointers?
I know this is a year late but I can't resist: @RCIX: You can't download instructions for a cut-out space shuttle, but you CAN download instructions for a real one: nasa.gov/centers/johnson/pdf/…
Jul
14
comment How to install C Compiler to Eclipse?
Bloodshed works, but there are better free IDEs out there. If you're not gonna go for VC++, I'd recommend Code::Blocks. It's free, updated regularly, and supports compilers other than GCC if you want to switch.
Jul
11
comment Does a JIT compiler have any disadvantages compared to a traditional compiler?
Okay, I think I understand well enough now. Thanks!
Jul
11
comment Does a JIT compiler have any disadvantages compared to a traditional compiler?
Oh I think I misunderstood what a JIT compiler is. I has assumed it would just fully compile the program when it was first run. Does it also function like an interpreter?
Jul
11
comment Does a JIT compiler have any disadvantages compared to a traditional compiler?
So basically a JIT might produce a faster executable but take way longer to compile?
Jul
10
comment Breaking a “for” loop using “break” considered harmful?
+1 for providing a good answer with this comic. I recall seeing one heavily upvoted answer that was this comic and nothing else, ugh.
Jul
7
comment Code Golf: Pig Latin
@Johannes: Ohhhh, that makes sense. If it's not a full program, I'm withdrawing my vote.
Jul
7
comment Code Golf: Pig Latin
Woah, I've never seen such a short golf in C#. +1