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Jun
29
comment What reasons are there for having comparisons be only of the form <= and >= (and not including =< and =>)?
I agree that from the programmer's perspective, since the language is borrowing a math construct, if the programmer is thinking in math constructs (which is reasonable) it shouldn't make a difference. However, the programmer is actually not writing math constructs (even though the language's borrowing of them makes this somewhat confusing). The developer is writing a programming language construct, which in this case only provides a subset of valid math constructs.
Jun
29
revised What reasons are there for having comparisons be only of the form <= and >= (and not including =< and =>)?
added 688 characters in body
Jun
29
answered What reasons are there for having comparisons be only of the form <= and >= (and not including =< and =>)?
Jun
26
comment Java generic map
Not really, it would just be "T extends myObject" previously it would have been a map of an interface or abstract class.
Jun
26
revised Java generic map
added 114 characters in body
Jun
26
answered Java generic map
Jun
24
answered How do I know what class called the abstract method?
Jun
23
comment Java formatting convention for new project
Disagreement is fine. I use whitespace to break code into chunks too. I'm talking about putting opening curly braces on their own line in if statements and around else statements. In my opinion that is a wasteful use of very space
Jun
23
comment Java formatting convention for new project
Note that this is in direct conflict with some languages where putting them on separate lines can facilitate ease of use of cli tools (C++ I'm looking at you!) But, Java isn't C++, so don't treat your rule set as subject to others that make sense in other languages (no hungarian notation, etc.)
Jun
23
answered Java formatting convention for new project
Jun
23
comment Replace String and check for uniqueness within String
You cannot replace them all with a regex. This requires more computational power than a discrete finite automata. You cannot solve the de-duplication with a string replace (easily) because you would have to not "replaceAll(...)" (with respect to the de-duplication) but rather "replaceAllAfterTheFirst(...)". In short, it's far better to actually split the string and then rebuild it, using a Set to "keep a list" containing only unique values.
Jun
23
comment Replace String and check for uniqueness within String
This may be upvoted, but it isn't going to ensure the uniqueness of each run between the || delimiters.
Jun
23
revised Replace String and check for uniqueness within String
added 504 characters in body
Jun
23
comment Replace String and check for uniqueness within String
The first replacement will concatenate two non-"RAI" values into one. Might want to fix it. Actually, all of these techniques will strip spaces in the wrong way
Jun
23
answered Replace String and check for uniqueness within String
Jun
23
comment JAVA weird String comparison issue
@achbee Thanks for the comment. You're right. The explanation covered half the issue, and it is broken in two ways.
Jun
23
revised JAVA weird String comparison issue
added 111 characters in body
Jun
23
comment JAVA weird String comparison issue
With both of the test cases outputting exactly the same message, how would you determine which if statement was successful?
Jun
23
answered JAVA weird String comparison issue
Jun
23
revised Is there a way to redefine a struct?
added 146 characters in body