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23
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Jul
17
comment Regex match digits, comma and semicolon?
@Gab That seems to focus on Perl regex and a couple of compatible "extension" GNU features, which might be heavily used; but, far from the only way to do it. In fact, there are many similar, but subtly different ways one can construct the "input string" to setup the regex. The actual mechanics of the regex matching is controlled by generated DFA, which (for those who don't know) is a Math construct, so really the "engine" can only perform one way (notwithstanding bugs). Looks like the extension eases the matching of whole lines, at the expense of making it difficult to capture empty lines.
Jul
16
comment Regex match digits, comma and semicolon?
If someone decided to make a regular expression language where '^$' means any input, then why even bother with the dot '.' and star '*' operators? I'm not doubting that someone might do it, but it basically means you can't match empty lines (which is dumb).
Jul
8
comment Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
@Greg Effectively, you would have to have two frames of "time" reference, the world (JodaTime) and the traveler (the linked list). It probably is problematic, but so is the concept of time travel in reverse.
Jul
8
comment Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
@Greg The book reference is a bit of fun, but it is serious too. It's likely a more accurate picture of what time travel might look like in a frame of reference of the traveler. If one traveled back and met themselves, then they would always have an unexplained meeting of themselves, which they would later discover to be explained by their own actions. This idea is also used comedically in "Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure" where, despite being reminded by their future selves, they don't wind their watch (which leads to them reminding themselves).
Jul
8
answered JAVA get the value from one class to another
Jul
8
comment JAVA get the value from one class to another
public member variables cause so many issues that are painful to fix.
Jul
8
comment Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
@Greg For example, a person walking backwards could be conceived as a person walking forwards with a negative time vector. It seems that's not what you are talking about. It seems you are talking about a list (ordered) of time events that, while each time event is ordered (start and end) the overall time list isn't. Some starts will be before other starts, and some ends might even terminate in the middle of other time events. This would allow modeling like described in "Fortunately, the Milk" where the characters unexpectedly see themselves only to know why later.
Jul
8
comment Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
@Greg so in seriousness, a vector has a magnitude, but what you have in JodaTime is that magnitude being the "normal" of the "time distance" in a direction. That means a vector representing a movie showtime which is four times longer than another vector representing a different movie showtime models a movie that takes four times longer to play than another. It doesn't "hold" displacement in time without displacement. If you perceive jumps as "instantaneous" (taking no time) then perhaps you can model it with a list of forward time vectors.
Jul
8
comment Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
@Greg From a purely narrative scenario, most time travel is modeled as "jumping" backwards to a new point where you move forward. In such jumps, they tend to be instantaneous. In reality, if something moved backwards, and from a frame of reference within still had a forward arrow of time, wouldn't it immediately collide with itself? Might want to consider that and design in some safety mechanism for your time machine :)
Jul
8
comment Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
@Greg Thank you for the kind words. The statements are simple, but the implications often are not. I've dealt (and written) time systems that handled intervals in the past. Joda's decision to have time unidirectional is why the intervals as a set of instants system works intuitively. You're need for bidirectional times intrigues me. For the interval as a set to work correctly, one needs bidirectional instants. I might have to attempt modeling the existence of the milk in "Fortunately, the Milk"
Jul
8
revised Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
added 1081 characters in body
Jul
8
answered Why must end be greater than start for a JodaTime BaseInterval?
Jun
29
comment What reasons are there for having comparisons be only of the form <= and >= (and not including =< and =>)?
I agree that from the programmer's perspective, since the language is borrowing a math construct, if the programmer is thinking in math constructs (which is reasonable) it shouldn't make a difference. However, the programmer is actually not writing math constructs (even though the language's borrowing of them makes this somewhat confusing). The developer is writing a programming language construct, which in this case only provides a subset of valid math constructs.
Jun
29
revised What reasons are there for having comparisons be only of the form <= and >= (and not including =< and =>)?
added 688 characters in body
Jun
29
answered What reasons are there for having comparisons be only of the form <= and >= (and not including =< and =>)?
Jun
26
comment Java generic map
Not really, it would just be "T extends myObject" previously it would have been a map of an interface or abstract class.
Jun
26
revised Java generic map
added 114 characters in body
Jun
26
answered Java generic map