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bio website decom.ufop.br/romildo
location Brazil
age 47
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 22 hours ago

I am teacher at the Computer Science Department of Federal University of Ouro Preto, in Brazil. My main interest is in Programming Languages, particularly the functional ones.


May
28
comment Haskell: <- in do notation for monad
runWriter writer runs the writer computation and results in the pair composed by the its return value and the final context. In your example, the computation returns 15 and the final context is ["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"], therefore the result is the pair (15,["Got number: 3","Got number: 5"]).
May
28
comment Haskell: <- in do notation for monad
No. Writer is a type constructor with arity 2 (that is, the Writer type constructor expects 2 type arguments in order to have a type). As a monad always is a type constructor of arity 1, we need first apply Writter to a type argument in order to get a monad. Therefore Writer is not a monad, but Writer [String] is.
Dec
28
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, but main = print (2*a) where a = 3 is right, and the where belongs to the full equation, and not to any particular expression. The variable a is defined locally to the equation, and could be used on its right hand side, or even in any guards on the left hand side.
Dec
28
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, consider for instance the following equation in a Haskell program: main = print (2*a where a = 3). It is wrong because 2*a where a = 3 is not a valid expression and the Haskell compiler just reports it as a syntax error.
Dec
28
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, as you think GHCi is no good example, then write a small Haskell program with an equation trying to use `where' in any place an expression is expected, except at the end of the equation, and you will get an error.
Dec
28
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, being a purely functional language is not related to the need to construct declarations. GHCi accepts expressions, which are compiled and then evaluated. It also accepts IO a actions as if they were part of a do expression. In this case the action is run. A Haskell program is built from a set of modules. One of them should be named Main, and should export the variable main :: IO a. A module can contain only declarations (types, variables, ...).
Dec
28
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, GHCi accepts expressions for evaluation. It evaluates the expression and proceeds differently based on its type. If the type of the expression is IO a, that is, the expression is a computation in the IO monad, that computation is run and its return value is shown. Otherwise the value of the expression is shown.
Dec
28
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, the expression let a = 3 in 2 * a evaluates to 6 with no problems in GHCi. It should not give any error. If it fails for you, something is wrong with your system.
Dec
27
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, but <expr> where <decls> is not valid Haskell syntax. For instance, if typed in GHCi, the phrase 2*a where a=3 is rejected with the error message parse error on input `where'. This happens because where can be used only with an equation, not with an expression. The source of misunderstanding may be the fact that the right hand side of an equation is an expression, making one to think the where is attached to it. But that is not the case. It is attached to the whole equation.
Dec
27
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, in <left> = let <decls> in <right> it just happens that the right hand side of the equation is a let expression. It could be any expression. The scope of any variable binding introduced by decls is limited to the let expression. With where the scope is the full equation, including any guards that may appear in the equation.
Dec
26
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
Summary: let is an expression which may introduce local variable bindings, and where may introduce local variable bindings to the right hand side of an equation.
Dec
26
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@JMCF125, where is not just let backwards. let <decls> in <expr> is a an expression, and as such it can be evaluated. Any variable bindings introducing ind <decls> are local to the let expression. <left> = <right> where <decls> is an equation that may define some variables appearing in <left>. For that it may use some local definitions introduced by <decls>. Any variable binding introduced in <decl> is local to <right>.
Dec
25
comment Why should I use case expressions if I can use “equations”?
@dfeuer This answer as it stands is still wrong: where can be used to introduce local declarations to an equation, not to an expression. You should use let in this case: let {f pat1 = e1; f pat2 = e2; etc} in f exp.
Sep
13
comment Annotated recursive data types with different type of annotation in AST
I do not know how I have not seen that! I was trying to share the unannotated tree between the input and output annotated trees, which does not have compatible types. The unannotated tree has to be reconstructed. Rewriting the first alternative of the case expression as follows fixes the issue: Num n -> return (In (Ann NUMERIC (Num n)))
Sep
12
comment Annotated recursive data types with different type of annotation in AST
@TomEllis, I have tried to make clearer what I am trying to do in the question.
Sep
12
comment Annotated recursive data types with different type of annotation in AST
@TomEllis, that was a mistake of mine when I typed the code. It has been fixed in the question now. Instead of Range, it should be Type inside the monad. The error reported by ghc still needs clarafication.
Aug
27
comment What does the `forall` keyword in Haskell/GHC do?
@DonStewart, may "it binds types to some scope" better phrased as "it binds type variables to some scope" in your explanation?
May
24
comment Should do-notation be avoided in Haskell?
I have edited my answer to better explain the idea, as suggested by @hammar.
May
24
comment Should do-notation be avoided in Haskell?
@hammar in my example action1, action2 and action3 stands for general actions that may need the result of previous actions. A more realistic example is do { x <- getLine; print (length x); y <- getLine; return (x++y) } where action1, action2, action3 and f stand for getLine, print (length x), getLine, and (++), respectively.
May
24
comment Should do-notation be avoided in Haskell?
It is clear that the do notation OR the functions (>>=) and (>>) are needed for sequencing IO actions, and that the do notation is expanded (that is, it is syntactic sugar) to applications of those functions.