1,574 reputation
11128
bio website marshallward.org
location Canberra, Australia
age 36
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen yesterday

At work, I do a lot of python and shell scripting, and a bit of Fortran, usually involving file systems and numerical solvers. I used to use C# and Java for little projects, but I've forgotten most of it. Once upon a time, I did hardware programming in C.

I like working with python and C#, and I have more respect for Fortran than most people.


Sep
9
comment Order of growth
n = O(log n) means that n can be bounded by a log(n), but surely that can't be true since n grows faster than log(n). The use of O() seems to be the opposite of how I've used it. Am I misunderstanding the notation?
Sep
3
awarded  Critic
Sep
2
revised Order of growth
added 5 characters in body; deleted 45 characters in body; added 15 characters in body; deleted 15 characters in body
Sep
2
revised Order of growth
added 17 characters in body
Sep
2
revised Order of growth
added 468 characters in body; deleted 1 characters in body
Sep
2
revised Order of growth
added 105 characters in body; deleted 51 characters in body; added 8 characters in body
Sep
2
revised Order of growth
deleted 3 characters in body; edited body; added 31 characters in body
Sep
2
awarded  Teacher
Sep
2
answered Order of growth
Aug
27
comment How to write a Fortran program that supports both static and dynamic memory management?
Thanks again, I've always used allocatables myself, but I wasn't aware of the advantages/disadvantages vs. pointers. You've been very helpful, even if it wasn't the answer I was expecting. It's good to know that HPC F9x programmers prefer allocatable over static arrays. I hope to get further good advice in the future!
Aug
27
accepted How to write a Fortran program that supports both static and dynamic memory management?
Aug
26
comment How to write a Fortran program that supports both static and dynamic memory management?
Thank you for the advice. Based on your suggestion, I probably won't implement the static memory allocation. But I am concerned about performance: The model which used this method claimed about a 20% performance improvement in static-compiled code vs allocatable code. If that's the case, then I would imagine it's worth the hassle. Is this your own experience?
Aug
26
revised How to write a Fortran program that supports both static and dynamic memory management?
edited body
Aug
26
revised How to write a Fortran program that supports both static and dynamic memory management?
added 3 characters in body; added 45 characters in body; added 9 characters in body
Aug
26
asked How to write a Fortran program that supports both static and dynamic memory management?
Jul
22
revised Static memory in python: do loops create new instances of variables in memory?
deleted 1 characters in body
Jul
22
accepted Static memory in python: do loops create new instances of variables in memory?
Jul
22
comment Static memory in python: do loops create new instances of variables in memory?
I worried that my example would permit nesting; it isn't as practical an option in the actual script. I think gnibbler's feedback correctly describes the situation, but thanks for your feedback. I was not familiar with the xrange function until you pointed it out.
Jul
22
awarded  Commentator
Jul
22
comment Static memory in python: do loops create new instances of variables in memory?
Thanks, this must be exactly what is happening: Without the del, my memory usage doubles, spills a bit into virtual memory (since my RAM happens to lie between one and two instances of y) and the script slogs on at low performance. I'll stick with the del solution for now; thank you again for explaining when/how the instances of y are created.