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Apr
17
revised Is there any reason to write `new Random()` since Java 8?
added 366 characters in body
Apr
17
comment Is there any reason to write `new Random()` since Java 8?
@leventov of course I agree with your points. I don't think you understand that ThreadLocalRandom is younger than Random and that not all runtimes like having thread local variables hanging around. ThreadLocal variables were put into Java version 1.2 where as Random is version 1.0. Also you may not have control over the ExecutorService if your on a different platform... There are some platform where you do not control thread creation and threadlocal variables maybe removed on every dispatch. Not everything is Java SE enterprise!
Apr
17
answered Is there any reason to write `new Random()` since Java 8?
Apr
17
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
17
comment Why does Chrome DevTools say my static resource is explicitly non-cacheable while mapped with Spring's mvc:resources?
I believe it is just the audit tool because if you look at the devtools network tabs you can see chrome doing the right thing and even if you refresh you get a 304 not modifed for the spring resource handler.
Apr
16
comment OutputStream already obtained :: Jackson Custom JSON Serializer + Spring MVC
Sadly the real exception is getting swallowed. This happens sometimes with Spring. I recommend you setup a error logging filter like this: stackoverflow.com/a/11692766/318174 . Once that is setup please post the real error message which will be the exception prior to the one you posted in the log.
Apr
16
revised XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
added 393 characters in body
Apr
16
comment XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
Ok did some testing and looks like the only way this could happen is your StaX implementation is not the default Java Sun one but rather Woodstox or some other Stax implementation.
Apr
16
comment XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
I just told you your character encoding is probably different on windows which will cause different behavior let alone different jar loading order can happen on different operating systems. I won't believe you till you set a breakpoint and prove that line separator, character encoding, and stream writer are all the same. My guess is one of those is different on your dev box. Otherwise you may have found a bug with how the character encoders are checking what System.lineSeparator() and allowing it to not be encoded which I doubt.
Apr
16
comment XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
There are so many things that can vary based on the operating system and even a JDK upgrade. With out a you telling me exactly what XMLStreamWriter your using and exactly what your character encoding you have and exactly what line separator you would like and that these are consistent across environments I have no idea what will happen but I do know that you can expect differences to possibly happen. The order of JAR loading alone can change which could cause a different XMLStreamWriter to get loaded. You need to use a debugger with some breakpoints to see what is happening.
Apr
16
comment XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
BTW you still might get escaped characters with this method if your systems character encoding is different than the output of the XML. That is if you write ASCII XML on Windows with System.lineSeparator() you might still have the problem. I also find it uncomfortable that your produce different XMLs for different Operating Systems. Better to explicitly have the lineseparator (ie lf) and character encoding (ie utf-8) the same on all OS if you can unless this is a desktop application.
Apr
16
comment XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
If you only had said in your original question that you were switching operating systems and that you didn't care what kind of newline it was I could have kept my answer simpler :).... I'm glad you figured it out though.
Apr
16
comment thread pooling for http requests
@kr.pradeep you can publish the messages and have them picked up by the same server you like. You can also use an embedded message queue if a separate infrastructure piece is not allowed (an example of an embedded queue-like system would be akka). One of the advantages to an external pub/sub system is that you don't loose messages when a server is shutdown and you can boot other servers up for elastic load balancing along with many other things.
Apr
16
comment thread pooling for http requests
You need to use a concurrent data structure for results or synchronize on it. Your answer is also not very fault tolerant as you don't provide any timeout for the response.get(). I could go on and on about how bad an idea using plain old ExecutorService but I suppose this is an option.
Apr
16
revised thread pooling for http requests
added 215 characters in body
Apr
16
revised thread pooling for http requests
added 423 characters in body
Apr
16
answered thread pooling for http requests
Apr
16
revised XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
added 133 characters in body
Apr
16
revised XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
added 547 characters in body
Apr
16
revised XMLStreamWriter - Java 8 - writeCharacters - 
added 266 characters in body