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  • 273 votes cast
Jul
15
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
29
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
15
comment Does Chrome actually preload HSTS?
Thanks a lot for your reply, Rob. I thought maybe that was "current" for Ubuntu =S... I had to run sudo apt-get -f install and install the package again. Now I'm running 42.0.2311.90 and it does show mail.google.com et al in the HSTS set. Time to reset passwords, I guess! Thanks again!
Apr
15
asked Does Chrome actually preload HSTS?
Mar
25
awarded  Favorite Question
Mar
9
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
15
revised Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
added 3 characters in body
Feb
15
revised Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
"previous prior" seems a bit redundant...
Feb
15
comment Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
Thanks for your input. Actually it's not about specificity, as the cascade (the tie-breaking mechanism) is not used at all: see the answer I posted. Moreover, specificity should not apply as we're dealing with different origins. Finally, if it specificity did apply we could use #all { color green; } and insert <body id="all"> at the beginning of the document, obtaining a specificity of (0,1,0,0), vs. (0,0,1,1) from the user agent. You can check the link is still not green.
Feb
15
answered Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
Feb
11
comment Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
I guess the inheritance definition explains it, a bit in passing for my taste: """If no color has been assigned to the EM element, the emphasized "is" will inherit the color of the parent element."""
Feb
11
accepted Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
Feb
11
comment Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
Reading the wiki carefully, I can't really see it addresses the issue either. Truth be told, I haven't read the standard from cover to cover! It must be covered somewhere...
Feb
11
comment Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
I'm upvoting all your constructive remarks, and for hearing me out :) No, the wiki (by the official W3C) does address the potential conflict. The cascade by itself in the standard ignores the issue. Now, at the risk of driving you mad, I can see how it works in practice, but it's far from obvious. The standard is greatly careful about specificity, order and other aspects, while this is officially neglected. If you edit your answer and include the (official) wiki I'll mark it as correct, but to me it's a shame that passage is not normative.
Feb
11
revised Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
added 136 characters in body
Feb
11
comment Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
That's closer, though still a wiki! I can't believe this issue is not addressed in the standard proper.
Feb
11
comment Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
Thanks, Huangism. Yes, I know from practice it works like that, but based on what I can read it shouldn't... It looks like the standard should have a note on the interplay between the cascade and inheritance.
Feb
11
comment Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
Thanks for your input. OK, I know it works like this, but I'm mainly looking for the legalese... where is this stated in the standard? Clearly h1 being explicitly purple should without further explanation "block" the green color it would otherwise inherit from body (and pass on purple to its descendants). And I know in practice your example works the way it does... but again, reading the standard I feel your defining font-size: 30px as an author should be applied wherever there is inheritance, and override all the affected UA properties...
Feb
11
asked Why does the UA's link color beat an author's color for (say) body?
Nov
16
awarded  Yearling