135 reputation
13
bio website
location London, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 10 hours ago

Currently being pulled into C# kicking and screaming! I love C/C++/Assembly and tinkering with things under the hood. I also love parallel programming, algorithm design and analysis.

My favorite all time lecturer is Shai Simonson (look him up on youtube, search for "coder island") and his youtube lectures have inspired me to master language design theory in my spare time.

My favorite OS is Linux Mint, it is just too good for words so try it out.

My hobby is programming, my job is programming so I am being paid to do what I love!


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
1
comment How do I “think in AngularJS” if I have a jQuery background?
Hi Josh/IMSOSP Thought 'd better tell you, I think someones is passing your answer of as one of their own.... see theprofessionalspoint.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/…
May
18
comment Memory segmentation
In this case the interviewer is probably trying to see if you can quickly see the intent behind the design, i.e. some parts of a system are invariant during the life time of the application and should not change (the code segment) and others are mutable (data). This is a common theme in any system...... Those that can understand code/design intent very quickly do not have such a steep learning curve when they join a team who are working on very large complex systems (however they might still hate the design!!! :-) )
May
18
comment Memory segmentation
Is it really a bad interview question??? It may be a hard question. Those interviewees that can demonstrate TRUE a passion for inner working knowledge, also tend to have awesome understanding of code intent and architect. It is a bit like the mechanic in a garage that relies on a engine management unit telling hie what is wrong and what he should do. Whereas another mechanic would know WHY the EMU is telling him that and make a confident decision if the EMU is right or the manufacturer is trying to screw you for more cash with expensive replacements and just fix the affected part!
May
9
comment Usage of frame pointer optimizations
Thanks Gene your answer was very helpful!
May
9
accepted Usage of frame pointer optimizations
May
9
comment Usage of frame pointer optimizations
Thanks....I realized afterwards some are opinion, based but others are fact/experience based.
May
7
comment Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
Thanks Dark Falcon I answered it below!
May
7
asked Usage of frame pointer optimizations
Apr
27
revised Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
Added some useful links.
Apr
27
revised Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
added 5 characters in body
Apr
22
accepted Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
Apr
22
answered Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
Apr
21
comment Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
P.S I don't know why I thought EBX might have some special usage much like EAX is used to return values, but maybe I am wrong....
Apr
21
comment Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
@Leaky that makes sense! so what you are saying if I imagined (arguments sake) there existed a convention whereby calling functions HAD to preserve all registers (except EBP and ESP) and let's take a scenario where for example the calling function (for some dumb reason) was going to call my simple function 5 times, then it would be forced to preserve the registers 5 times when it clearly doesn't need to! So hence as a balance, everyone has agreed that the my function will preserve EBX, ESI and EDI instead. Thanks for that, it makes sense now!
Apr
21
comment Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
haha found it! One of the answers to this question stackoverflow.com/questions/370195/… states "the opcode 0xCC is the int3 opcode, which is the software breakpoint interrupt. So, if you ever try to execute code in uninitialized memory that's been filled with that fill value, you'll immediately hit a breakpoint, and the operating system will let you attach a debugger (or kill the process)."....it's all coming together nicely
Apr
21
comment Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
@Dark Falcon. Thanks for the answer. I am not trying to measure efficiency but rather trying to understand intent here. When you say " unused memory is filled with 0xCC to help you catch uses of uninitialized memory" do you mean this line of code "mov eax,0CCCCCCCCh". If so I am not sure how moving a constant into eax does what you say, can you give me any pointers to sites to read more on this.....
Apr
21
comment Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
Understanding intent is key for me. I understand it is convention but whilst I agree it makes sense for my function to preserve the base and stack pointer in order to maintain stack frame structure consistency, state and integrity, the same cannot be said of the general purpose registers EAx, EBX, ECX, EDI and ESI. Surely the usage of these registers is known by the calling function and it should preserve what it needs and leave what it does not, this is a much cleaner model and optimises away unnecessary register preservation. Hence my question why preserve EBX ESI and EDI if not needed.
Apr
21
revised Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
added 13 characters in body
Apr
21
comment Disecting x86 stack frame set up Visual C++ (Visual Studio 2010)
Yes the clue was in the last sentence, I did state the register preservation code is not present in release mode, ergo the code above contains register preservation so cannot be release code. I will edit the question.