63,843 reputation
1277149
bio website
location Portland, OR
age 65
visits member for 6 years, 1 month
seen 12 hours ago

Business Systems Analyst. Enterprise Systems Architect. Software developer. Custom applications framework design and implementation. Multi tier applications and database systems architectural design and implementation. Service oriented architecture (SOA) component design & development. Relational Database (schema) design and development. Microsoft .Net applications design and development. Agile, SCRUM, & Waterfall SDLC Methodologies including Test Driven Development (TDD) and Unit Testing (NUnit)

merge keep


Dec
19
comment C#: Oracle Data Type Equivalence with OracleDbType
@Wernfried, thanks! I Have edited answer to reflect this.
Dec
19
revised C#: Oracle Data Type Equivalence with OracleDbType
added 71 characters in body
Dec
17
comment What does a transaction around a single statement do?
@Pacerier, I am not fluent in MySQL, but I would be flabbergasted if their product behaved differently in this regard from other relational products. One of the newer non-relational database products, like noSQL, might operate under a different paradigm, but I'd bet MySQL is the same.
Dec
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
1
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
17
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
14
revised How to calculate difference in hours (decimal) between two dates in SQL Server?
edited body
Nov
14
comment In SQL, how can you calculate maximum concurrent number of users
then you need to rephrase your question, because it is not clear what you mean by "max"
Nov
14
answered In SQL, how can you calculate maximum concurrent number of users
Oct
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
30
awarded  Yearling
Oct
26
awarded  Enlightened
Oct
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
24
revised Create a date with T-SQL
added 150 characters in body
Oct
20
comment Are all data pointers of the same size in one platform?
ahhhh, but I was not... I was talking about why you would need sizeof(somePointer) for a malloc on a machine where pointers are all always the same size... Clearly, if they're always 8 bytes, it is silly to run sizeof().
Oct
20
comment How threads know about the address of a shared variable
right, this is a non-issue... If you pass a variable "from one thread" to a function executing in a different thread, the other thread does not know, or care, what thread the variable was created on... It just accesses the memory address, period. There is no need to acsess a threads' "stack pointer", or know anything sabout the variables physical (is that what you meant by absolute?>) address. The virtual address of the variable is passed in the functions parameter list, and that's it.
Oct
20
comment How threads know about the address of a shared variable
Threads have their own stack to allow creation and release of stack frames for functions that have been called on a thread of execution, so that the thread knows where to return to when a function executing on a thread finishes processing... not to control access to memory...
Oct
20
comment How threads know about the address of a shared variable
But isn't the stack for each thread still part of the same memory map issued by the OS to the process that all threads reside within ? i.e., if one thread has the virtual address of a variable from another thread, it does not need to "thunk" out to the OS to get the actual physical address to access it.
Oct
20
comment How threads know about the address of a shared variable
I'm not a c-proficient person, but I thought that Within a single OS process, all threads share the same memory map. Memory allocated on one thread is not in a different place or managed in a different way, from memory allocated on any other thread, right? The only distinction I was aware of that needs to be made is for Single Threaded Apartments (STAs), where some restrictions are necessary to control what functions are allowed to manipulate resources (windows, graphics objects, etc.) created on one thread from those on another...
Oct
20
comment Are all data pointers of the same size in one platform?
@Matt, but isn't the sizeof() used for malloc() the size of the object the pointer points to, not the size of the pointer? the number of bytes passed to malloc is the number of bytes of memory to be allocated, which is the number of bytes per object, times how many objects.... not the number of bytes in pointers to those objects...