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Mar
11
comment How should custom elements in knockout communicate with their collaborators?
I'm really not a fan of string-based events. I've experimented with this and found that the string itself can introduce a hard coupling between custom elements. I see the risk that one custom element may stop working when we remove another one.
Mar
10
revised How should custom elements in knockout communicate with their collaborators?
Added link to fiddle
Mar
10
comment How should custom elements in knockout communicate with their collaborators?
Interesting! Let's compare notes. I created a fiddle where I added some extras to show more closely what I have in mind. In general, I think it's bad practice to declare an observable in one view, then bind to it in another. Also using observables for inter-component communication feels wrong. In the fiddle, I try to remove coupling between components and formalize the communication contract in their own classes.
Mar
9
awarded  Custodian
Mar
9
reviewed Approve Matching a substring of different category from vba code and putting into different columns
Mar
9
comment How should custom elements in knockout communicate with their collaborators?
@Tyblitz, how would you design to custom elements to communicate with each other, or any other component? As to why, I don't want element-a to be coupled to element-b. And if I want two instances of element-a on a view, I don't want events from one to interfere with the other. Let's say three of the elements are different filters, one element is a list, and the main viewmodel references the actual service which executes the query and returns the filtered result. Let's say that the list is also used in other views, but with a differen service and no filter.
Mar
7
asked How should custom elements in knockout communicate with their collaborators?
Mar
7
comment Post XML in body of rest call using Rest Sharp
@TimCopenhaver, I think you misunderstand my needs: I have a customer which calls my api from BizTalk. Something fails and they can only provide me the xml. Now I have to test / debug with that piece of xml, and I want to do it in code. Mostly because I think that's easier than setting up fiddler, but also because code can be saved between reboots. This is about debugging, not writing an api client.
Mar
6
comment Post XML in body of rest call using Rest Sharp
It makes perfect sense to post xml directly when I want to debug when something fails and BizTalk is the client.
Jan
19
comment WCF at Services faulted state
Kind of defeating the purpose of using, doesn't it? WCF never stops amazing me of how badly designed it is.
Dec
28
comment C# using “?” if else statements to set value whats this called
Ternary just means the operator consists of three parts, right?
Dec
28
comment Conditional operator in C# and return types
I have been reading explanation other places in the mean time, and the reason why things are the way they are seem to be a desire to support as many use cases as possible, however ugly or unlikely they are. I disagree, but what can I do? When it comes to give the team credit, I think they do a great job. But they are still human. Someone actually thought if (myEvent != null) myEvent(new MyEventArgument()) was a good idea, while totally ignoring what pub-sub is all about.
Dec
28
comment Implicit conversion issue in a ternary condition
Ok, I think I understand how the current rules are easier to implement. But I don't get your last comment, maybe we are thinking of different things? If we let the compiler account for the result type when given, the underlying type of the expression will not change. How can that change the meaning of the program?
Dec
28
comment Conditional operator in C# and return types
@Jon, ok, I see why inferring types from bases can be a problem. But that applies only when I assign the result to a var. In all other cases the assigned type is known. I can't see this as anything but an oversight when the spec was written.
Dec
26
comment Conditional operator in C# and return types
@Jon: If I write object o = b ? new A() : new B() there is nothing for the compiler to figure out except for: Are both expressions assignable to o? The fact that there are no relations between A and B is irrelevant. Everything the compiler needs to make this work is already there.
Dec
25
comment Conditional operator cannot cast implicitly?
var x = y is different from int x = y and should be treated differently. In the first case I ask the compiler to figure this out, in the latter I tell it what I expect. And, as @devuxer says, most developers expect ?: to work like if-else.
Dec
25
comment Why does null need an explicit type cast here?
I'd say there is a problem with the spec. Why isn't the assigned type considered at all? And why not the base classes?
Dec
25
comment Conditional operator in C# and return types
But why is it designed this way? Isn't it counter-intuitive? I appreciate how the best type is determined when I want to assign to var, even more if base-classes where considered. But when I assign to a known type, why is it interesting if the two expression types are related?
Dec
25
comment Conditional operator in C# and return types
But why is that? Each expression determines their own type, but only one is evaluated at runtime. As a programmer, I only care if the result is assignable to my variable. It would be nice if it could infer the type when I use var, but all the time base types aren't even considered, it will do a lousy job doing that and I have to add that ugly cast anyway.
Dec
25
comment differences between the conditional operator and an if-else:
The problem with the specification is that it doesn't consider the type of the assignment. We don't have to assign the result to anything, but that is not the typical use case. The type doesn't matter when you don't assign the result, anyway. In the typical use case, I would argue that we don't really care if the expressions are compatible with each other. Only one of them will be evaluated, and the only compatible type of interest is the type of the assignment. So int? x = b ? 42 : null should be perfectly legal. So should object x = b ? 42 : null.