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May
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awarded  Commentator
May
6
comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
Sorry, I also just noticed a bug in my code. You may have to swap the let statement with the first if statement. I edited my answer to reflect this.
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revised Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
You may be passing the wrong parameters into the helper function. Make sure that if the node has been visited, you don't push the neighbors onto the stack. Also make sure that you're putting the current node into the visited list if it isn't already: (cons currentNode visited).
May
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awarded  Teacher
May
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
You will, however, have to change the visited list you pass into the helper functions. So one of the parameters would be something like: (cons currentNode visited).
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
No. You can imagine the calls to look something like this: dft -> helper -> helper -> helper -> helper. dft calls helper. Then helper calls helper, which calls helper, which calls helper, which returns the visited list. Since all the previous functions simply return the results of whatever they called, the visited list is passed upwards as the return value of these calls.
May
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
It won't lose elements if you return it. If you substitute "visited" for the '() right before the first comment, the visited list as it is when you're done visiting will be returned. Since we're always returning the result of helper, this visited list will be propagated up through the recursive calls, and dft will actually return the visited list.
May
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
I should make my last comment clearer. I'm assuming we push all neighbors onto the stack as long as the current node hasn't been visited. If you'd like to filter out the neighbors that have been visited before pushing them, you can remove the inner-most if statement, since the current node will never have been visited (remember, we get it from the stack). There's even a scheme function called filter that you could use to remove all the visited neighbors from the list of neighbors. This approach might be a bit more complicated, though.
May
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
I suppose it's also worth mentioning that you could eliminate the inner if statement if you never push visited nodes onto the stack. I'm assuming we simply push all neighbors onto the stack.
May
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
You can push nodes onto the stack in the parameter list. For example, one parameter could be something like this: (append neighbors (cdr stack)) This represents a new stack made of the old stack minus the current node, with the neighbors pushed onto the top.
May
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revised Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
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May
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comment Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
Sorry, I originally wrote the function thinking trees instead of graphs. You would pass the graph in to the function, since you would need the graph to find the neighbors. I've edited the code to be clearer.
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revised Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
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revised Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
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revised Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
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awarded  Editor
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revised Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
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answered Scheme Depth-first search of a graph function
May
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answered Weak hypotheses in boosting method