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awarded  Nice Answer
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awarded  Guru
May
22
comment Is “program to interfaces” a common design principle in C++ projects?
@h9uest mmmmaybe! Even if a project is sensitive to performance, it's still only perhaps 10% of the actual code in that project that's at all sensitive to performance. For most of the code, it just doesn't matter. Go for the approach that yields the simplest, most understandable code. Then at least it'll be easy to modify later, if and when you find out that performance is an actual problem.
May
21
awarded  Nice Answer
May
20
comment Visual C++ and extremely long strings
Yes, the James in question is McNellis. The one and only. :)
May
19
comment Why does boost::scoped_ptr prevent PIMPL idiom with BCB6?
You're using a 13 year old compiler. Try with a modern compiler instead? :)
May
18
comment VC++ 11 - std::condition_variable_any not compatible with standard?
In general, don't expect anything other than the most minor bugfixes to VC++ in post-release updates. They extremely conservative in that regard.
May
17
comment VC++ 11 - std::condition_variable_any not compatible with standard?
There are plenty of shortcomings and bugs in Microsoft's C++11 compliance still. It doesn't help that you're not using their latest compiler, of course, so yeah, it seems likely that there are issues with their implementation. Regarding the definition of cv_result, I'd imagine that it's a workaround because this compiler doesn't support class enum. I haven't checked though, just a guess.
May
14
comment #pragma pack effect
So the lesson is not "packing is beneficial" (packing violates the types' natural alignment, so that hurts performance), but simply "don't over-align beyond what is required"
May
14
comment #pragma pack effect
In other words, a double expects to be on an 8 byte boundary. Putting it on a 7 byte boundary will hurt performance. But putting it on a 16, 32, 64 or 4096 byte boundary buys you nothing above what the 8 byte boundary already gave you. You'll get the same performance from the CPU, while getting much worse cache utilization for the reasons outlined in that post.
May
14
comment #pragma pack effect
@Pacerier Not really. That post talks about some fairly extreme alignment (aligning on 4KB boundaries). The CPU expects certain minimum alignments for various data types, but those require, in the worst case, 8-byte alignment (not counting vector types which may require 16 or 32 byte alignment). Not aligning on those boundaries generally gives you a noticeable performance hit (because a load may have to be done as two operations instead of one), but the type is either well-aligned or it isn't. Stricter alignment than that buys you nothing (and ruins cache utilization
May
14
comment LPCSTR, LPCTSTR and LPTSTR
@Pacerier I'm not sure. "Template" or "Type", possibly?
May
11
comment std::strings with and without \0 termination
A std::string is not null-terminated in the sense that its end is not determined by the null byte. Its end is determined by the end iterator (or the string's length). The null byte is there solely in order to faciliate the conversion to a C-style string, but it is not significant in and of itself, and it is not part of the string's value.
May
11
comment std::strings with and without \0 termination
The null byte is stripped. As in, it is not part of the string. The string is guaranteed to have length 2, and contain the two characters a and b and nothing else. The buffer may well be null-terminated, but the string does not contain the null byte.
May
11
comment std::strings with and without \0 termination
if you want to know if s1 and s2 are equal, you can just check it yourself: bool are_equal = s1 == s2;
May
6
awarded  Notable Question
May
1
answered Does an OS lock the entire amount of ram inside your computer
Apr
29
awarded  visual-studio-2008
Apr
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
27
comment C++ compilation linking error in OS X
I edited your question to add in the information from the gist. :)