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2d
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
2
comment Why “move semantics” rather than simply memcpy?
The short answer is "it is undefined behavior. It breaks assumptions that an optimizing compiler may rely on, so it can result in all sorts of unpredictable bugs". There is no finite limited and predefined list of "possible issues with this approach". What problem are you trying to solve with this?
Sep
1
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
28
comment Why do 64 bit systems have only a 48 bit address space?
BryanBuckley there's no simple answer. It depends. No doubt they could implement it with relatively few extra transistors, but then it might be slower than if they allowed themselves to use a lot more transistors. It's a trade-off. And until very recently, it was a trade-off where CPU manufacturers saw absolutely no gain, no reason to spend a single transistor on it. As agam showed in the comment above that might be about to change
Aug
28
comment Why do 64 bit systems have only a 48 bit address space?
@agam Ooh, that's interesting. Luckily, there's nothing stopping CPU manufacturers from enabling use of longer addresses. Perhaps it won't be long before they start using some of the remaining bits then. :)
Aug
19
awarded  Guru
Aug
13
awarded  Good Question
Aug
12
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
9
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
3
comment Ternary operator ?: vs if…else
@zoujyjs no, C has the same rule. But under the as-if rule, the compiler is free to cheat, as long as the end result is correct. So as long as there are no side effects, the compiler can make this optimization.
Jul
30
comment C binary reaches 1.2G memory limit
@AndrewHenle: a negative int32 sign-extended to a 64-bit value and then converted to a size_t? That's going to be a really really big number, which might well cause maloc to return null.
Jul
30
comment C binary reaches 1.2G memory limit
@EOF: it looks like he doubles the allocation size each time though. So from 1.2 to 2.4GB would be a problem
Jul
28
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
22
comment Why is volatile not considered useful in multithreaded C or C++ programming?
@SumitTrehan that's implicit in the mutex. It implies a memory barrier, so when it is executed, the compiler is instructed to ensure that all writes to variables that may be visible to other threads should be flushed to memory.
Jul
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
3
comment How is Unicode different from ASCII?
doh yeah, you're right of course
Jul
2
answered How is Unicode different from ASCII?
Jul
2
comment Why is std::unique_lock not derived from std::lock_guard
why should there be? Merely "looking similar" isn't a very good reason to derive from another class.