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comment C# multithreading vs multiprocess 64 bit
It doesn't really make a difference whether you're on a 32 bit or 64 bit machine. The architectural tradeoffs are the same either way. In terms of efficiency, suffice it to say that both can be very efficient, if written correctly. What's more interesting is which solution is simpler, and more robust, and easier to get right
Jun
26
comment How to add a 'or' condition in #ifdef
@iEngineer #elif defined(CONDITION1) || defined(CONDITION2)?
Jun
20
comment what is difference between kernel and driver?
Loosely speaking, the kernel works in isolation. It is the basis on top of which everything else (including drivers) is built. Drivers are effectively plugins extending either the kernel or the broader OS
Jun
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
11
comment c++ standard practice: virtual interface classes vs. templates
"You only way to know is by looking for a decent documentation about it" - or by trying to compile and seeing which functions the compiler complains about being unable to find, yes. Also, Concepts are intended to solve this problem. (And even if it had been an interface, you'd still need to find decent documentation. Knowing which functions to override is not enough. You also need to know what their semantics should be, and the interface doesn't tell you that). Still, you are right. There is a reason the language supports both. :)
Jun
9
comment Compiler behavior and “register storage class specifier is deprecated”
According to open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2015/n4340 and botondballo.wordpress.com/2015/06/05/…, it looks like register is planned to be removed entirely, which means it may eventually lead to compile failure.
Jun
7
comment piglatin duality C++
@librik the first half of your comment is perfectly on point, but why are you implying that all SO questions must be about "serious" programming done for a company for commercial purposes? Some people write code for fun, or as a learning exercise. I'm pretty sure SO has no rule against that.
Jun
7
comment C++ Array Inquiry
No it isn't. The type of a string literal is const char[N]. It's not an address.
Jun
7
revised How do I pronounce things like “680x0” and memory addresses?
edited tags
Jun
7
answered How do I pronounce things like “680x0” and memory addresses?
Jun
7
comment How do I pronounce things like “680x0” and memory addresses?
that's not C. I assume you mean numbers like 0x680, and not 680x0? (0x is a prefix)
Jun
7
comment Why is `++` for Haskell List implemented recursively and costs O(n) time?
I like algorithms which depend on "there may be some tricks to do this in constant time". :)
Jun
2
comment int a=int(); what happens in C++98?
Most compilers make no distinction between C++03 and C++98. The former was effectively a bugfix for the latter, so compilers tend to merge them together and give you C++03 if you ask for C++98
Jun
2
comment Is “program to interfaces” a common design principle in C++ projects?
@h9uest some people split the implemention out into ".inc" files or similar (which are then included from the header). And if the set of types the template is going to be instantiated with is known (and small) then you could define the member functions in the.cc file and explicitly instantiate the template there. But other than that, nope, no great solutions unfortunately.
May
30
comment How init() works internally when used in C++
init() is nothing more than six characters that look like a function call. Which init are you talking about, that is relevant to a C++ environment?
May
30
comment Destructor that calls a function that can throw exception in C++
@SergeRogatch no problem :) And yeah, misleading would be a better word. :) (And thanks for pointing out the error.)
May
30
comment Is storing an invalid pointer automatically undefined behavior?
What is "to be gained" from these rules for pointers in C++ is generality and efficiency. It allows for simpler, more efficient pointer comparisons on some architectures (say, ones with a segmented memory model, where being able to make these simplifying assumptions allows for a simpler implementation of pointer arithmetics and pointer comparisons.
May
30
comment Is storing an invalid pointer automatically undefined behavior?
You're moving the goalposts. First, you say "An OS requires this feature. Then you give an example of how malloc could be implemented using such a feature. And now you're giving an example of an OS that happened to not use this particular C++ feature because it was not written in C++. It's getting a bit hard to see where you're going with this. C++ should support a feature it already supports because some OS'es weren't written in C++, and were able to depend on implementation-defined behavior that made the feature unnecessary at the language standard level anyway?
May
30
comment Is storing an invalid pointer automatically undefined behavior?
@supercat the semantics you're asking for are effectively what's provided by std::less. :) (and additionally, of course, the OS generally isn't bound by the rules of C++. It is free to provide additional implementation-dependent guarantees)
May
30
comment Is storing an invalid pointer automatically undefined behavior?
@supercat why would an OS need that? The OS doesn't go around testing the objects you create in your program...