149,686 reputation
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bio website jalf.dk/blog
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visits member for 6 years, 1 month
seen 10 hours ago

Hi!

I'm on twitter. And I have a blog, as linked to elsewhere on this page.


6h
awarded  Nice Answer
1d
revised Assigning const unsigned char* to a std::string performing in-place substitution or omission
Fix syntax error *properly* :)
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revised Assigning const unsigned char* to a std::string performing in-place substitution or omission
rolled back to a previous revision
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comment Assigning const unsigned char* to a std::string performing in-place substitution or omission
Or use xelatex, which accepts UTF-8 out of the box
1d
answered Assigning const unsigned char* to a std::string performing in-place substitution or omission
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answered Why C++ STL containers use “less than” operator< and not “equal equal” operator== as comparator?
Nov
25
answered Double header inclusion in C++?
Nov
25
comment Java garbage collector - When does it collect?
It is just an implementation of the heuristic that "if an object was just created, the odds are good it'll become garbage soon, so any time we need to free up memory, these should be the first objects we check. But if it's been alive for a long time, it'll probably stay alive for a long time. So checking up on it constantly would be inefficient"
Nov
25
comment Java garbage collector - When does it collect?
@Mr.Goose no, when garbage is identified, it is freed. A generational GC means that the GC only checks for certain objects whether they are garbage. It frequently checks if any newly created objects (generation 0) can be freed. If an object survives long enough to reach a certain threshold, then it is put into generation 1, which means the GC won't check it during normal, fast, garbage collections. Every once in a while, the GC will look at gen1 objects to see if any of them can be released as garbage, and rarer still, it'll look at gen2 objects (up to however many generations the GC uses)
Nov
20
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
16
comment Make sure all communication inside Visual C++ solution is in UTF-8
Those are completely orthogonal issues. All the project settings can do is specify how the source code should be interpreted by the compiler. But that has nothing to do with which byte sequences are sent where at runtime by the compiled program. Your program will send the data you tell it to send, regardless of what compiler flags were used. It is up to you to ensure that the data you send to those plugins is well-formed UTF-8. The compiler doesn't know what that data is going to be. It doesn't have a time machine, it can only control what happens at compile-time, not when you run the program
Nov
16
comment Make sure all communication inside Visual C++ solution is in UTF-8
What communication? What your program does has nothing to do with the encoding used for the source code or project files themselves.
Nov
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
1
comment Security concerns on implementing application network protocol
@Panayiotis that has to be part of your own protocol. TCP doesn't help you with that. You have to figure that out based on the data you receive as part of your message. You can sanity check your size field too (ensure that you've actually received at least as many bytes as the size field says there should be, before you try to process the message), but at the end of the day, you get the data you get, and you have to write code to determine if it looks trustworthy. Yes, network programming is hard if you want it to be reliable.
Nov
1
comment Security concerns on implementing application network protocol
@Panayiotis when you receive a message, you know its size, right? That means you know the address it begins on, and the address it ends on. So do all the offsets point to addresses that lie between those two points?
Nov
1
comment Security concerns on implementing application network protocol
@EdHeal you're right, but the OP explicitly talked about malicious users. I'm not saying that encryption alone solves his problem entirely, just that if he is concerned about the data being tampered with in-flight, it's an obvious solution to that part of the problem.
Nov
1
comment Security concerns on implementing application network protocol
If the OP doesn't want third parties to modify the data in flight? He seems concerned about malicious parties trying to bring his software down by forging his protocol messages
Nov
1
answered Security concerns on implementing application network protocol