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Mar
17
comment C++ Optimization Techniques
No, that's not inlineable, because the type says nothing about which function is called. It only says "a function taking no arguments and returning void" will be called. The compiler can't inline that. That is precisely the problem. The function has to be identifiable through the type to be inlined
Mar
17
comment Modern C++ Design Generic programming and Design Patterns Applied
I think that's probably the best reason there is in favor of template magic. Letting you move errors from runtime to compile-time saves a lot of time and effort for everyone. +1
Mar
17
revised C++ Optimization Techniques
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Mar
17
comment C++ Optimization Techniques
Of course when you work with functors, you'd typically make the exact type a template parameter, so it would use static polymorphism rather than the dynamic variant.
Mar
17
comment C++ Optimization Techniques
I never said they were equivalent. That's why I said to prefer functors. Not "always use functors", because obviously you can't. But use them when you can. I'm not sure what you mean about the functorless version. What would you want it to take, a ref to a function? Doesn't solve the problem.
Mar
17
comment When should I use the new keyword in C++?
Of course, you're right. I wasn't really thinking about static data. My bad, of course. :)
Mar
17
revised When should I use the new keyword in C++?
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Mar
17
comment When should I use the new keyword in C++?
The short answer is, use the short version when you can get away with it. :)
Mar
17
answered When should I use the new keyword in C++?
Mar
17
answered Reading from 16-bit hardware registers
Mar
17
comment C++ Optimization Techniques
Edited my post to answer that one better.
Mar
17
revised C++ Optimization Techniques
added 1281 characters in body
Mar
17
answered when should a member function be both const and volatile together?
Mar
17
comment Are there any compilers that IGNORE C++ standard about default inline functions?
Yes it does answer your question. There is no requirement in the standard that things must be inlined, and so there is nothing for the compiler to IGNORE. You are asking whether any compilers ignore a requirement that doesn't exist.
Mar
17
answered Are there any compilers that IGNORE C++ standard about default inline functions?
Mar
17
answered Is using .h as a header for a c++ file wrong?
Mar
17
comment Is using .h as a header for a c++ file wrong?
The standard library is a special case though. Don't start writing headers with no extensions.
Mar
17
answered Profiling programs written in C or C++
Mar
17
answered C++ Optimization Techniques
Mar
17
revised GC.Collect in a loop?
added 435 characters in body