142,433 reputation
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bio website jalf.dk/blog
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visits member for 5 years, 8 months
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Hi!

I'm on twitter. And I have a blog, as linked to elsewhere on this page.


Mar
14
comment Where can I report .Net Framework bug?
Step 1: Get someone else to take a look, and confirm that it is a bug. (Post the code to reproduce the bug here) Step 2: Report it to connect.microsoft.com
Mar
14
answered How to write a std::bitset template that works on 32 and 64-bit
Mar
13
comment How do you create a function that returns a function in your language of choice?
@Jon: It's a very common technique, and used a lot in the standard library. An object that overloads operator() is called a functor. Very useful if you want to use some custom comparer while sorting with std::sort, for example
Mar
13
comment What is a practical, real world example of the Linked List?
Are you asking for an analogy, similar to the common (but flawed, I think) cars <-> inheritance? Or a programming problem where you'd use a linked list?
Mar
13
revised How do you create a function that returns a function in your language of choice?
added 195 characters in body
Mar
13
comment How do you create a function that returns a function in your language of choice?
It can be done simpler though. fun quadratic (a, b, c) x = a*x*x + b*x + c; :)
Mar
13
answered How do you create a function that returns a function in your language of choice?
Mar
13
comment How do you create a function that returns a function in your language of choice?
@ted: In a way. Yes, it's strictly speaking an object, but it acts pretty much as a function. It defines the () operator so it can be called as a function, and especially in templated code, treated completely as a function. It's the best you're going to get in c++. :)
Mar
13
comment UTF-8 vs Unicode
I think UTF-16 only equals "Unicode" on Windows platforms. People tend to use UTF-8 by default on *nix. +1 though, good answer
Mar
12
comment What's the difference between C and C++
Of course, it also enables features that, when used, introduces some overhead. But you don't have to use them, and often, using them is no slower than implementing the same yourself in C. It's meaningless to compare the "speed" of two languages.
Mar
12
comment What's the difference between C and C++
C faster? What gives you that idea? Are you saying that if I take a C program, feed it to a C++ compiler, it magically becomes slower? Or perhaps that C++'s std::sort is slower than C's qsort (hint: it isn't). C++ has a lot of tools to increase performance far above C.
Mar
12
answered What's the difference between C and C++
Mar
12
comment What's the difference between C and C++
lol That's not true though. The result of your equality test is undefined... :) I wonder what that says about the two languages. :p
Mar
12
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
12
comment Good Idea / Bad Idea Should I Reimplement Most Of C++?
C++ is certainly not the only viable language for 3d graphics. It's commonly used for that, yes, but pretty much every language has OpenGL bindings, and .NET at least has DirectX ones as well.
Mar
12
revised Good Idea / Bad Idea Should I Reimplement Most Of C++?
added 135 characters in body
Mar
12
answered Good Idea / Bad Idea Should I Reimplement Most Of C++?
Mar
12
comment Good Idea / Bad Idea Should I Reimplement Most Of C++?
How is maintenance easier when reinventing the wheel? Won't that just mean more code to maintain, and fewer people familiar with it?
Mar
11
comment Can a string literal and a character literal be concatenated?
You're right, of course. Edited my post.