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Feb
11
comment strings in C++
Yep, it wouldn't be C++ if there wasn't some ambiguity with at least 3 ways to do the same thing, would it? ;) But they all have the same effect. The string is created and initialized in the constructor, rather than first calling the constructor, and then assigning afterwards.
Feb
10
comment Is a function an example of encapsulation?
Agreed. Seems obvious to me too. Some people just get hung up on what their OOP textbook said. Going back to the definition, that encapsulation hides implementation details so the user don't have to worry about them, a function is obviously an example of encapsulation.
Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
true. But still worth mentioning so people don't blindly trust the instruction count to say everything. :)
Feb
10
comment strings in C++
copy-on-write is generally no longer used, because it becomes inefficient in a multithreaded environment.
Feb
10
answered strings in C++
Feb
10
comment strings in C++
Of course the compiler can optimize it away, if it is clever enough to determine that it has no side effects, and so the declaration and initialization can be merged back together. But that's not a given.
Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
It's not quite that bad. If you check Intel's docs, a modern x86 has a latency of 3-4 cycles, and of course fully pipelined. Further, many of these multiplications can be replaced with bit shifting at compiletime. But you're right, latency is higher. My bad there. :)
Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
Yep, it's hard to optimize without looking at the generated assembly. +1 for that. Simply going by the instruction count is probably not very reliable though. When you take into account data dependencies, pipelining and instruction reordering, more instructions may lead to faster execution.
Feb
10
revised Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
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Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
It may not be a net advantage. Continually modifying the same variable means latency becomes an issue. Adding various offsets to the same constant base address allows each index to be computed in parallel.
Feb
10
revised Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
added 951 characters in body
Feb
10
revised Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
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Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
Besides, on most modern CPU's, mul and add are equally fast.
Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
on x86 in, the entire array indexing can be done in a single instruction (with 1 cycle's latency, as I recall), and so it won't be a problem. On other platforms, this may be an issue, but I doubt it. It's the memory accesses that are heavy in this code, not the arithmetics.
Feb
10
revised Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
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Feb
10
answered Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
Feb
10
answered Memory allocation
Feb
10
revised Memory allocation
formatted code
Feb
10
answered What are the performance implications of marking methods / properties as virtual?
Feb
10
revised .NET Optimized Int32
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