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bio website jalf.dk/blog
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Hi!

I'm on twitter. And I have a blog, as linked to elsewhere on this page.


Mar
15
comment As a programmer with no CS degree, do I have to learn C++ extensively?
Dunno. :) Depends on what you want to learn the most. However, if I had to pick one subject to learn in order to understand "what goes on under the hood", I'd say learning how compilers work would be the best choice. A valid strategy is just to go for what you think sounds interesting. :)
Mar
15
comment Why is getcwd() not ISO C++ compliant?
I don't think anyone ever claimed that the Win32 API was compliant with anything whatsoever. windows.h doesn't even compile if you disable language extensions in VC++. :)
Mar
15
comment As a programmer with no CS degree, do I have to learn C++ extensively?
Agreed. But then experience is not the best teacher, as you implied. Experience plus a good book, is the best teacher. ;)
Mar
15
comment As a programmer with no CS degree, do I have to learn C++ extensively?
Assembler isn't really an abstraction. It's a 1 to 1 mapping to machine code. Writing "add" instead of 0x43ab isn't an abstraction, it's just easier to remember. And there is a lot of value in understanding what goes on under the hood. Also, having a degree has nothing to do with knowing C++
Mar
15
comment As a programmer with no CS degree, do I have to learn C++ extensively?
If you have to choose which to learn first, I'd say functional, for two reasons: 1) it's easier to grasp if you're not yet too entrenched in the imperative mindset, so the sooner you learn it, the better. And 2) learning the concepts of that isn't going to take as long as learning C++ extensively
Mar
15
comment As a programmer with no CS degree, do I have to learn C++ extensively?
I wonder where he found a C99 compliant compiler. Does one even exist? :p
Mar
15
comment As a programmer with no CS degree, do I have to learn C++ extensively?
@tvanfosson: Some don't learn at all by doing, is his point. Or another way to put it: Doing makes you more experienced (and better) at doing the same thing you've been doing all along. Reading might teach you new things. Which is best? I'd say both are useful.
Mar
14
comment What's on your C++ cheatsheet?
+1 for that. It might seem like overkill to non-C++ programmers, but it's really the only sane approach to the language.
Mar
14
comment Changing C++ output without changing the main() function
Eh, you could define your own variable 'cout' in the global namespace, and have it print "I love you" to std::cout. :)
Mar
14
comment Why 'this' is a pointer and not a reference?
Well, it is also often useful for an object to get a reference to itself. I'd say that's a more common usage. Anyway, the main reason is like you said, references didn't exist when they created the 'this' pointer.
Mar
14
comment Where can I report .Net Framework bug?
Step 1: Get someone else to take a look, and confirm that it is a bug. (Post the code to reproduce the bug here) Step 2: Report it to connect.microsoft.com
Mar
13
comment What is a practical, real world example of the Linked List?
Are you asking for an analogy, similar to the common (but flawed, I think) cars <-> inheritance? Or a programming problem where you'd use a linked list?
Mar
13
comment UTF-8 vs Unicode
I think UTF-16 only equals "Unicode" on Windows platforms. People tend to use UTF-8 by default on *nix. +1 though, good answer
Mar
12
comment What's the difference between C and C++
Of course, it also enables features that, when used, introduces some overhead. But you don't have to use them, and often, using them is no slower than implementing the same yourself in C. It's meaningless to compare the "speed" of two languages.
Mar
12
comment What's the difference between C and C++
C faster? What gives you that idea? Are you saying that if I take a C program, feed it to a C++ compiler, it magically becomes slower? Or perhaps that C++'s std::sort is slower than C's qsort (hint: it isn't). C++ has a lot of tools to increase performance far above C.
Mar
12
comment What's the difference between C and C++
lol That's not true though. The result of your equality test is undefined... :) I wonder what that says about the two languages. :p
Mar
12
comment Good Idea / Bad Idea Should I Reimplement Most Of C++?
C++ is certainly not the only viable language for 3d graphics. It's commonly used for that, yes, but pretty much every language has OpenGL bindings, and .NET at least has DirectX ones as well.
Mar
12
comment Good Idea / Bad Idea Should I Reimplement Most Of C++?
How is maintenance easier when reinventing the wheel? Won't that just mean more code to maintain, and fewer people familiar with it?
Mar
11
comment Can a string literal and a character literal be concatenated?
You're right, of course. Edited my post.
Mar
11
comment .NET Optimized Int32
But 32-bit values can still be processed more efficiently. There's nothing .NET can do about that.