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Hi!

I'm on twitter. And I have a blog, as linked to elsewhere on this page.


Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
Besides, on most modern CPU's, mul and add are equally fast.
Feb
10
comment Any way to make this relatively simple (nested for memory copy) C++ code more effecient?
on x86 in, the entire array indexing can be done in a single instruction (with 1 cycle's latency, as I recall), and so it won't be a problem. On other platforms, this may be an issue, but I doubt it. It's the memory accesses that are heavy in this code, not the arithmetics.
Feb
10
comment .NET Optimized Int32
true. By default I mean the data sizes that the CPU can process most efficiently. Less than 32-bit means more work in load/store operations (because part of the read/write has to be masked out), and larger than 32-bit requires longer instructions (and may, on some CPU's also be slower in itself)
Feb
9
comment What kinds of interview questions are appropriate for a c++ phone screen?
That's a valid answer too, of course. ;)
Feb
9
comment What kinds of interview questions are appropriate for a c++ phone screen?
Nope, of course there isn't. But it's a way to probe people's knowledge of C++. If they know that it results in undefined behavior, then it's a sign that they've spent enough time with C++ to know that it's not as intuitive as it looks.
Feb
9
comment C/C++ optimize data structures, array of arrays or just array
And the computation of the index makes no difference no matter the ratio of CPU/memory, because it's the exact same thing in both cases. A 2d array is indexed in exactly the same way as he showed for a 1d array
Feb
9
comment C/C++ optimize data structures, array of arrays or just array
You'd only get a cache miss once for each cache line though, and that's pretty much unavoidable. But once all the data has been touched, it'll fit easily inside the cache, so unless you suddenly pull in a lot more data, you won't get cache misses.
Feb
8
comment How can I trust the behavior of C++ functions that declare const?
Like I said in my answer, don't use code you don't trust, and write unit-tests if you suspect the third-party code you're using doesn't do what it's supposed to.
Feb
8
comment How can I trust the behavior of C++ functions that declare const?
But you can test it. And of course, don't use third-party code you don't trust. The same applies to any third-party code, even if it doesn't violate const-ness. How can you be sure that a socket send() function does what it claims to do?
Feb
8
comment Why is <u> evil while <strong> and <em> is not?
That's true, but it's not the answer. The answer is simply that strong and em are semantics (emphasized text), while underline is presentation.
Feb
7
comment Producing 64-bit builds on Windows with free software
What's the problem with using MSVC Express? It can be configured to use the Win SDK compiler. Wouldn't that solve the problem?
Feb
7
comment Where to put try catch
Yeah, catch the exception where you're able to deal with it. If you don't know what to do with it, don't catch it. (And sometimes, "catch it and ignore it" might be the valid thing to do with it, so do that.)
Feb
7
comment C/C++ check if one bit is set in, i.e. int variable
It's also specific to the x86 architecture. So no, definitely not portable.
Feb
7
comment C/C++ check if one bit is set in, i.e. int variable
And in case you're using C++, you could (should) write a template instead of a macro. :)
Feb
6
comment Composite Pattern Iterator without recursion
Well, it's hard to traverse a tree without making some kind of assumption about its structure. The same approach can be trivially modified for any tree structure. Go through its children, then up to the parent and try the next child node
Feb
6
comment Matrix implementation benchmarks, should I whip myself?
There are many seemingly harmless things you can do in C++ which nevertheless ruins performance. Taking something like Python or Java, performance is much more straightforward and predictable even to non-experts.
Feb
6
comment Matrix implementation benchmarks, should I whip myself?
Yes and no. It's certainly possible to write slow code in any language, but in C++, it's the default, if you don't know exactly what you're doing. As an example, C# does not invoke dozens of unneeded copy operations, and it does not punish you for calling new(). Those can be very expensive in C++.
Feb
6
comment When don't I need a typedef?
I wouldn't blame C++ for that. But yes, namespace certainly has a more basic meaning than the C++ implementation In the end, it's just the ability to distinguish between identical names, by storing them in separate "spaces", and that concept exists in most languages in some form.
Feb
5
comment Do I need to lock STL list with mutex in push_back pop_front scenario?
SGI's STL is not the same as the STL-alike implemented in the C++ standard library. The latter says nothing about concurrency or threading. (There are a number of other differences as well, though these aren't relevant here). But in short, you can't assume that what SGI says will apply to the stdlib
Feb
5
comment Writing long and double is not atomic?
This is not true of all languages. Of course it's often a sensible assumption to expect machine-word sized data, and nothing else, to be atomic, but it's a property of the language. Unless you specify a language, it's impossible to say what is/isn't atomic.