Jonathan

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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Apr 11 '11 at 17:02

Nov
18
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
6
awarded  Commentator
Feb
6
accepted In Haskell, why do I need to put a $ before my do block?
Feb
6
comment In Haskell, why do I need to put a $ before my do block?
Well, I guess the report makes this answer definitive. I guess I'm just having a harder time getting used to Haskell's lambda-calculus style function application that I thought I was.
Feb
6
comment In Haskell, why do I need to put a $ before my do block?
Thanks, Callum. I guessed that ($) was mostly about syntax when I tried to write a definition of it and came up with ($) f x = f x. From my limited sources it seems like Haskellers really like to avoid parens, where possible. I guess it's just hard coming from other languages, where I'm good at reading add( 1, add( 3, 4)). Especially when there are combinators being used
Feb
6
comment In Haskell, why do I need to put a $ before my do block?
Dang, I'm making all the comments. I've played around some more, and it might just be down to my expecting Haskell to start a "block", and it just doesn't. It's probably because C is my baseline language, and the book says "The do keyword introduces a block of actions ....."
Feb
6
comment In Haskell, why do I need to put a $ before my do block?
Ah, NoScript needed to allow one more domain! It looks alright now. Thanks, Jon!
Feb
6
comment In Haskell, why do I need to put a $ before my do block?
Sorry, folks, I don't know stackoverflow very well. The code is just trash. (Why isn't there a "Preview Question"). I'll try to re-post it.
Feb
6
asked In Haskell, why do I need to put a $ before my do block?
Jul
26
awarded  Scholar
Jul
26
accepted In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
Jul
26
comment In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
I think bta nailed it in his/her update: The spec says that the first slot in a for statement can be either an expression (e.g. i=0, j=1) or a simple declaration (e.g. int i=0, j=1, but only one 'type' allowed.)
Jul
26
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
26
answered In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
Jul
26
revised In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
clean-up
Jul
26
awarded  Editor
Jul
26
revised In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
Summarizing results so far..
Jul
26
comment In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
This is cool, and nice to have in my toolkit, but I think in this case it obscures more than is useful. I'd rather maintain code that declared i and i2 outside of the for() loop. Thanks.
Jul
26
comment In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
James, are you saying that commas can be of two different kinds, either as a comma operator as part of an expression, or as part of a ?something else, what?
Jul
26
comment In C++ why can't I write a for() loop like this: for( int i = 1, double i2 = 0;
Precedence! I've been away from C for a while and have lost my habit of throwing in parentheses 'to be safe'.