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Sep
18
answered Memoizing tail call optimized recursive functions in F#
Sep
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
15
comment Excel prefix formula F#
@Jon: Unless someone finds a way to write a quine formula in Excel...
Sep
15
comment What's the reason for not being able to use more than one params parameter in a method definition?
The thing that makes C# often very complicated is that it needs to preserve the behavior from previous versions and add new features on top of it without breaking anything. This is why overloading in LINQ is difficult. And yes - I think that they did it for LINQ because otherwise, LINQ wouldn't be as nicely useable (which was the main point of the project)...
Sep
14
answered What's the reason for not being able to use more than one params parameter in a method definition?
Sep
14
comment F# Type declaration possible ala Haskell?
@Kevin: I'm not really sure, but I agree that the Haskell way looks more readable then mixed header/type annotations. It is probably the OCaml tradition, because I don't think there is any technical issue with this. Writing them inline would make sense... (Another question is whether this is worth the limited F# team resources at this point)
Sep
14
answered F# Type declaration possible ala Haskell?
Sep
14
answered Extension method in a where clause
Sep
14
comment iterator block to LINQ
@recursive: I didn't try it, but I think that the base case is when operations is an empty sequence - in that case, the query will return empty sequence immediately (the structure of the recursion is the same as in the OP's version).
Sep
14
revised iterator block to LINQ
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Sep
14
revised iterator block to LINQ
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Sep
14
answered iterator block to LINQ
Sep
14
answered IQueryable: Creating dynamically an OR filtering
Sep
14
answered Excel prefix formula F#
Sep
14
comment Wait for any event of multiple events simultaneously in F#
@Ronald: Observables use a different technique then the one described in the referenced paper. Briefly (I don't have much time right now) - when you start listening to an observable (e.g. created using map), it returns a token that can be used to unregister from the original event source.
Sep
13
comment Wait for any event of multiple events simultaneously in F#
Could you consider changing the code to use Observable instead of Event? (Using Event.xyz in this scenario can cause leaks - see my answer for more info...)
Sep
13
comment Wait for any event of multiple events simultaneously in F#
Be careful! When you use events created using Event.xyz combinators together with AwaitEvent and let!, you can create a memory leak (when you do the waiting in a loop). You should always use Observable module instead of Event if you want to combine combinators with asynchronous workflows. See my answer for more details...
Sep
13
answered Wait for any event of multiple events simultaneously in F#
Sep
11
comment It is possible to get functionality similar to .NET's LINQ in C++?
@Missing Faktor: The techniques that I used in the implementation of CLinq would work in plain C++ too. It is in C++/CLI only because I wanted to use the existing .NET API (LINQ libraries), but that could be reimplemented in C++. CLinq is pretty much implemented just using templates (not generics :-)) and usual operator overloading.
Sep
11
revised How do you deal with sequences of IDisposable using LINQ?
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