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Feb
4
comment Some difficulties of designing with types in F# by simple graph example
@Feofilakt Entire collections don't get copied. In an immutable environment you can reference previous datastructures safely because they don't change. Adding an element to an list is basically (1) create a new element (2) Let it point to the old list. You only need full copying of data-structures in an mutable world. In an immutable list: Adding/Removing from the beginning is fast. In an mutable array adding/removing at the end is fast. And the opposites are slow.
Feb
1
comment Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
@FuleSnabel Delegate is an immutable object. let dels = x.multicast creates a thread-local copy. To ensure the freshnes of x.multicast i added a MemoryBarrier before the assignment. After that Combine and Remove working on a thread-local copy of x.multicast. The only important thing is, if a MemoryBarrier after CompareExchange is needed. Becaus only CompareExcahnge will change x.multicast. But as far as i found the CompareExchange should emit MemoryBarriers and also Mono emits explicit Memorybarriers after compareexchange on other systems than windows.
Feb
1
comment Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
@FuleSnabel You don't need Memorybarrier for thread-local variables. The point of a memory barrier is that pending reads/writes on a variable are commited so other threads that also access those variable see the most recent value. Variables that are not accessed from multiple different threads don't need memory barriers. Otherwise we would even need MemoryBarriers in single-threaded code.
Jan
31
comment Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
@FuleSnabel Combine and Remove writes to a local variable. So a Memory Barrier should not be needed. I think you probably mean after CompareExchange? I still reading if a MemoryBarrier is really needed.
Jan
31
revised Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
fixed MemoryBarrier
Jan
31
revised Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Fixed MemoryBarrier
Jan
31
revised Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Fixed example with MemoryBarrier
Jan
31
comment Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
@FuleSnabel i anyway made an error, as i used "x.multicast" in Delegate.Combined and Delegate.Remove. The operation should better work on the fetched dels variable. As far as i think, then i only need a single MemoryBarrier before reading from x.multicast to ensure the freshness of x.multicast.
Jan
31
accepted Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Jan
31
revised Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Added a Benchmark
Jan
31
revised Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Fixed the example for subscribing/unsubscribing.
Jan
31
revised Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Fixed grammar.
Jan
31
answered Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Jan
31
comment Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
As for your last sentence. Every async started with Async.Start runs on the thread-pool, but also using let! or do! can switch the async to another thread, for example just using "Async.Sleep" does switch to the Thread-pool or using Async.StartChild. On top i'm triggering event from MailboxProcessor and those also always run one some threads on the thread-pool. So i don't see how to make everything run on a single-thread. But i also wouldn't want this behaviour. I'm expecting this kind of behaviour as i don't want to run everything on a single-thread anyway.
Jan
31
awarded  Informed
Jan
31
revised Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
added 93 characters in body
Jan
31
awarded  Student
Jan
31
asked Using F# Event in multi-threaded code
Nov
26
comment Custom prefix operators in F# once again
There are left and right-associative operators. And in-,pre-,post-fix operators. The rule is simple. If you create an operator before midnight it is left-associative, after midnight it is right. If you are Human it is infix, for Werewolves it is prefix, and vampires only creates postfix. But Vampires with blood type AB+ are also infix like humans. Werewolfs that creates operators at full-moon are also infix, but humans at full-moons are prefix. On a 13th friday in a month, all operators are postfix. Vampires cannot use "~". That is how i understand operator definitions in F#.
Nov
25
answered Simple exercise of OCaml about list