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comment How to get the last value of Arraylist
@feresr huh. He wants to get the last value in the list. Of course that implies that size() is > 0. That would be true for any sort of implementation. Reading through to the end would have saved the time you needed to write your comment and my time for answering :) My answer says at the end "If the list is empty, get throws an IndexOutOfBoundsException"
Jan
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
16
comment Why are anonymous namespaces not a sufficient replacement for namespace-static, according to the standards committee?
@ErikAronesty I doubt you tried exactly that, because my code has no main function, whereas your compiler complains about some code within a function called main. So if you use above code and wonder why it raises an error in a broader context (I'm pretty sure there is a conclusive explanation), please put up a new Stackoverflow question.
Jan
13
comment Where and why do I have to put the “template” and “typename” keywords?
So for f(), assuming it refers to a function, f is never parsed as a type-name even though it would grammatically match. The reason being that f does not refer to a type. When the compiler parses T::X *y; and finds T::X is not known to be a type, it immediately stops parsing the "declaration specifiers"/type part and takes T::X to be the name of whatever is being declared, instead (and this causes a subsequent syntax error for the following *). Perhaps they could change the grammar and make this special case work. I haven't got enough expertise to answer that one, though.
Jan
13
comment Where and why do I have to put the “template” and “typename” keywords?
@JorenHeit I agree with you that at class scope, looking up-front then T::X *y; is not ambiguous. A C++ parser works left-to-right though and the rule for type names is that identifiers can only be parsed as type names if they denote a previously declared type (at least that's my understanding of it).
Jan
10
awarded  Good Question
Jan
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
7
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Jan
5
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Dec
31
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Dec
30
comment How does `void_t` work
@dyp sorry for the confusion. I meant 3p8.
Dec
30
comment Is it possible to include a type `T`'s string expansion into the error message given by `static_assert`?
Lulz ur welcome
Dec
30
comment Is it possible to include a type `T`'s string expansion into the error message given by `static_assert`?
I clarified the question's title.
Dec
30
revised Is it possible to include a type `T`'s string expansion into the error message given by `static_assert`?
edited title
Dec
30
comment Is it possible to include a type `T`'s string expansion into the error message given by `static_assert`?
@Mohamadshiralizadeh he interpreted his question to be a question actually about static_assert and whether it supports a certain feature and not about converting T to its string representation in general. And he answered with "no, it is not possible". IMO it is a reasonable interpretation of a (slightly) ambiguous question and a reasonable answer.
Dec
30
comment How does `void_t` work
These phrases seem to be sufficient to describe explicit specializations: 14.4p1, and the "Unless a ..." rules in 14.7.1p1..p5. The matching is implicit by 3.8 and 14.4p1.
Dec
30
comment How does `void_t` work
@dyp for explicit specializations, there is no argument deduction involved and stuff is much simplier. As far as I can remember, the necessary text for matching to explicit specializations is present (and is a few words), but don't quote me on that :) Has been some time since I last looked into the spec for anything.