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May
19
comment npm: How to create debug and production builds with the correct dependencies?
Thank you for your answer. I've actually already read the article, I guess my question is how can I use one dependency or the other elegantly depending on which thing I want to build. I would think that this is a common problem and that there should be an option in npm, but maybe I'm wrong...
May
19
comment npm: How to create debug and production builds with the correct dependencies?
Well, one could just use the 'scripts' part in the package.json file instead ... what I am wondering about is how the build process would pickup the right dependencies, I guess....
May
19
comment npm: How to create debug and production builds with the correct dependencies?
oh well... they use grunt.js. But is that really necessary?
May
19
comment npm: How to create debug and production builds with the correct dependencies?
But quite often the maintainers publish both debug and production builds. In reacts case, for example, they differ by more than just minification ... oh wait, I'll just look at how they do it ...
Jun
18
comment Is there a better C?
@didierc You're right of course. What I wanted to say was that even though many languages compile to C they usually introduce some overhead that a program written in C would not have. ATS's selling point then is that it has all these safety features but that it ensures them entirely at compile time and does not introduce overhead and is thus on-par with C's performance.
May
21
comment Tools for static type checking in Python
@postfuturist: You're right, I overlooked that. Hm, that is somewhat disappointing...
May
3
comment In Clojure 1.3, How to read and write a file
@Mars Thanks. Actually I did answer this question first, but Michiel's answer has more structure and that seems to be very popular.
Apr
2
comment Is there a better C?
@ReneSac Thank you for the additional info. It's always nice to learn more about these things. As for GC it's all about different tradeoffs I guess. While I think Rust's facilities are pretty nice (especially from a theoretical point of view) they're also not as easy as to use as garbage collection. And there are probably not that many programs that can't afford Nimrod's soft real time guarantees ...
Mar
31
comment Is there a better C?
@ReneSac Thank you for pointing this out. If I understand correctly then I still think that Rusts facilities for manual memory management are much nicer, in particular turning GC either completely on or completely off via a command line flag seems pretty crude in comparison. I deposit that Rusts facilities will work for the vast majority of cases and you can use GC / ref counting for the few structues for which it doesn't suffice (provided there are any) instead of for the whole program. Defaults make a world of difference in my experience.
Feb
20
comment Simple π(x) in Haskell vs C++
@PythonNut He's likely referring to unboxed vectors: hackage.haskell.org/package/vector-0.10.9.1 Vectors are not as typical a choice in functional programming as they are in imperative programming though (difficulty with immutality).
Feb
20
comment Simple π(x) in Haskell vs C++
@PythonNut Ah, ok. Not sure what the issue is then. Performance can vary a bit across compiler versions and backends. I usually declare victory when I get into the 50% slower than C range though ;)
Feb
20
comment Simple π(x) in Haskell vs C++
@JohnL interesting observation. I guess a look at the Core would yield clarity, it's a bit late for me now ...
Feb
20
comment Simple π(x) in Haskell vs C++
@PythonNut: If you run it with profiling enabled it will be slower of course. In my experience you can get pretty close (+50-100%), but parity can sometimes be hard / impossible to achieve. Depends on your experience, I am not the absolute expert here. What will stand between you and performance though is that these expressive languages can make it really tempting to use high level constructs that will not be as fast as a bare-bones loop. The lazy list is a case in point. Still, most of the time it doesn't matter and you're still getting good speed.
Feb
11
comment How to avoid OOP deep class hierarchies when switching to Haskell?
I agree with both of you and think this discussion is really good to put things into perspective. I am wondering what good these existential boxes really serve, especially since with lazy evaluation you could just provide a container with the desired results without paying for it until it is needed. I think it is somewhat comforting that this possibility exists, but I don't see too much use for it.
Feb
11
comment How to avoid OOP deep class hierarchies when switching to Haskell?
@Zeta this is true, however it is possible to use typeclasses to do this (at the expense of additional datatype), see the edited answer above.
Jan
21
comment Webframework written in / compiling to SQL?
If it is possible it must be done! There are webframeworks written in COBOL!
Jan
21
comment Webframework written in / compiling to SQL?
Well, that's in part why I am curious if such a thing exists. I don't think any of these are definitely impossible to achieve (I might be wrong of course). My premise is that much of what web applications typically do should be possible with SQL. So why not?
Jan
21
comment Webframework written in / compiling to SQL?
@MrSimpleMind Its not necessary to expose the db server directly, a (small and generic) wrapper would be ok. But the main app logic should live on the db server. Of course you must still not trust arbitrary input, but I don't think that this is conceptually impossible in this setup.
Jan
21
comment Webframework written in / compiling to SQL?
@MrSimpleMind I don't understand how your comment relates to my question.
Jan
21
comment is Haskell suitable for statistic analysis
I have both used R and Haskell for statistic analysis (and love Haskell much more than I like R) and my answer is: it depends. R has much more libraries, and common tasks (such as reading csvs) are much quicker done in R. Furthermore, R lends itself much better to interactive experimentation than Haskell (you can use ghci, but its support for graphing etc. is really not on par). On the other hand I find that Haskell is much much more maintainable. If your quick explorations tend to turn into long lived programs, then it might still be worth using Haskell.