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Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
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suggested rejected edit on scala 2 dimensional array
Nov
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awarded  Informed
Oct
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awarded  Enthusiast
Jul
16
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
Thank you for low latency lesson but I use all of the techniques you mentioned (including self-made, hand-optimized asm buffer ring a'la disruptor). I don't use any system calls, except for the failure mode to restart thread. As I said before, the worker threads are only consumers which can fail because it won't introduce any latency in workflow, though some work items may be lost.
Jul
16
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
@FrankH.: the core part is sensitive to latency. Any error there is unrecoverable. It's totally different story for the "plugins" - failure there should be tolerated. See discussion above, I said there that plugins operate on "isolated" memory so any corruption there won't affect others.
Jul
16
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
@FrankH.: of course I did that. Still cache is a big unknown for me.
Jul
16
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
@jxh: The only scary part is cache due to its complicated behaviour. No cache lines are lost during processes switching? Thanks for your comments :)
Jul
16
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
@jxh: are you 100% sure that atomics, barriers and cache work the same in threads and processes with shared memory? If yes, I will reconsider separate processes :)
Jul
16
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
@jxh: I couldn't find good resources on how mapped (shared) memory go along with: 1) atomic operations 2) memory barriers 3) cache coherence 4) maybe some other things which I forgot for now. I suspect that mapped (shared) memory works just identically in threads and processes but I cannot confirm this. For ex. if cache coherence is worse (due to slightly bigger memory fingerprint) I will lose some nanos and that's not acceptable. Examining Linux kernel code for all these things is a bit of work, which I can't afford right now.
Jul
16
revised Making process survive failure in its thread
added 253 characters in body
Jul
15
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
@fizzer: Core system can't be stopped one started but 'plugins' are replaceable. BTW. Guys I'm aware of all problems you mention. I do a lot of low-level system programming including kernel programming so you don't have to convince me but this particular system needs low-latency more than elegance and fault-tolerance is second (but less) important thing.
Jul
15
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
@jxh: I will violate my NDA and disclose another detail for you ;). The shared memory is being filled by producer, then chunked and then chunks are given to the threads and they hold sole ownership so it's unlikely that one thread will destroy another thread's memory (still possible - I know).
Jul
15
accepted Accurate way of measuring overhead in kernel space
Jul
15
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
Ok but I'm killing thread just after SIGSEGV and other, so the registers "go away" with thread's context, am I right?
Jul
15
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
That's honest answer at least :) but I want to kill offending thread just after signal is received - ignoring is not the solution. BTW. The core of the system is strictly verified so only the unsafe part needs to be debugged what can be done somewhere else.
Jul
15
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
Ok, you are right - I have no fault isolation but I need some fault tolerance - I need just the opposite to the fail-fast property. I can reformulate the question to: how to stop Linux from killing process on thread's SIGSEGV/SIGBUS/SIGFPE and just ignore the context. If pthread_exit is doing some catastrophic things I will hack kernel to change behaviour of SIGSEGV/SIGBUS/SIGFPE. @jxh: I need smallest possible latency and to share a lot of memory. Processes in such situation would be hard to code and maintain no to mention possible problems with used non-blocking algorithms.
Jul
15
awarded  Commentator
Jul
15
comment Making process survive failure in its thread
Without going into details, unsafe code is loaded for doing some experiments which may have errors which should not kill whole system. The system itself have to be ultra-super-high-low-latency so I cannot afford any sandboxes etc. Please think more about the problem mentioned than why I have such problem.
Jul
15
revised Making process survive failure in its thread
added 5 characters in body