246 reputation
18
bio website chipaca.com
location Cordoba, Argentina
age 40
visits member for 4 years, 9 months
seen May 14 at 23:24

Senior Engineering Manager, Online Services at Canonical.

When Ubuntu One breaks, it's my fault.


Apr
27
revised Performing grep operation in tar files without extracting
added 516 characters in body
Apr
27
answered Performing grep operation in tar files without extracting
Mar
22
accepted What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
Mar
12
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
the reason for splitting the two loops is to be able to test the inner loop, which is typically the bit that varies the most between subclasses and has the most results parsing and validation, separately from the outer loop, which has deduplication and pagination logic (and is typically a lot more reusable, and nontrivial enough that I don't want it n-uplicated).
Mar
11
awarded  Critic
Mar
11
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
@alexis yes, consume would be the put-it-in-the-database step or what have you.
Mar
11
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
@alexis the inner loop is telling the outer loop to quit via the StopThisThing exception.
Mar
11
awarded  Scholar
Mar
11
awarded  Commentator
Mar
11
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
not sure how threads would help; the conflicting goals here are, in my mind at least, wanting to be able to easily test the individual fetcher (the thing that hits a single page) without having to go through the outer loop, while also allowing the inner loop to signal all the way up. So I'm probably missing something about your suggestion to use threads.
Mar
11
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
Agreed re bad API design (or implementation; this doesn't feel designed to error out the way it does); government website from a developing country (so I'm surprised it even has an API), and the contractor seems to have left shortly after hooking this thing up. I don't care about page boundaries at all (in fact, they change -- they might change while I'm walking the pages, in fact, with new items added at the start, so I have to be ready to filter dupes).
Mar
11
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
if I ignore that item (still have to filter it out, mind), the next page will be mimetype text/html and consist of a <b>, three PHP database errors, and a </b>. None was a bit of fiction to try to forget.
Mar
11
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
your fetch_all function is an iterator that produces iterators, which I now have to unroll (so I still have to do "extra work"). And yes, one of the ways this API signals that there are no more pages is by having an item be a database error.
Mar
10
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
This would certainly work, but it feels like I'm doing the same thing I'm hating this API for: in-band there-is-no-more-stuff information. On the other hand I'm the only consumer of this particular one, so ...
Mar
10
revised What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
renamed "stuff" functions to `prepare` and `consume`
Mar
10
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
edited to make the example clearer WRT @RikPoggi's point
Mar
10
revised What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
explicitly added the fact that weird rows can also cause termination
Mar
10
comment What do you call an iterator with two different “done” states?
@RikPoggi I don't think so: the termination can happen after fetch_one has already yielded useful data.
Mar
10
awarded  Yearling
Mar
10
awarded  Student