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Aug
4
comment Python: Finding a path between nodes within groups with nested dictionaries
You probably have a circuit somewhere in the model (as mentioned)... e.g. Karl sold to Jane, who sold to Bob, who sold to Tim, who sold it back to Jane, who sold to Rick. When you get to Jane, you don't know whether to walk to Bob, or to Rick, so if you choose Bob, you'll continue walking around in a circle forever. Without knowing anything about your code at all, this would be the first thing to check. A graph might not be a good choice for this; better to just have a list that you append to, i.e. a defaultdict(list) might be a better model.
Jul
24
comment object storage in python that allow tuples as keys
something like [x[1:-1] for x in xs[1:-1].split(',')] should work in that case. Not allowing commas in the strings might not be an onerous requirement - they could be identifiers, for instance - but it's certainly not general. (literal_eval or pickle both handle this already, of course, by either doing full syntax decoding (literal_eval) or storing an intermediate representation (pickle).
Jul
24
comment object storage in python that allow tuples as keys
btw, a solution like @Brian's above is way faster than even cPickle (i used tuple(int(x) for x in y[1:-1].split(',')) before i saw his, which is very close, and took 300nS). but i don't think a simple solution like that exists for arbitrary strings.
Jul
24
comment object storage in python that allow tuples as keys
it's not a loss of generality... ('1,0', '0') is different from ('1', '0,0'), and the repr versions are also different (they're exactly what i wrote above). that said. if you need to iterate keys a lot (which requires reversing them), ast.literal_eval (what i would use) is very slow (~15 uS, vs. ~1.5uS for cPickle). if you're only doing lookups, then you don't need to reverse. But I suppose pickle is far more general, and these times are probably going to be dwarfed by DB lookup for most cases (when it's not already in memory) anyways...
Jul
22
comment object storage in python that allow tuples as keys
btw (way too many comments, sorry!) - repr is about 3x faster than pickle: json.dumps((1,0)) = ~4.37uS, pickle.dumps((1,0)) = ~1.42uS, repr((1,0)) = ~511nS on my machine.
Jul
22
comment object storage in python that allow tuples as keys
actually, what i was going to post is a simpler version of what you've already accepted... but in general, every picked tuple should be unique.
Jul
22
comment object storage in python that allow tuples as keys
It's not error-prone... i posted an answer that demonstrates this, every tuple that is different should have a different (backwards-compatible) encoding... but it does involve processing on every lookup. I don't see any way around that really though (somewhere). I realized that you may get better performance with repr vs json.dumps though...initial tests show about an order of magnitude improvement there. i'll propose a solution below...
Jul
22
comment object storage in python that allow tuples as keys
you could build a proxy class that just json-encodes the input (so it's a string) and passes that on to shelve/shove... then they would be guaranteed to be strings... assuming the tuples are simple (i.e. only composed of data that is json-encodable, not complex classes)...
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
1
comment short form for string.format(…,**locals())
actually, this is true sometimes, but not always... it looks like locals() actually returns a pointer to the dict value of 'locals', which seems to change. You can do the following experiments: f = locals(); x = 1; g = locals(); f == g, which will be True, even though you've modified a local value between f and g. Also: def fn(x, l=locals()): print l[x]; x = 2; fn('x'); x = 3; fn('x') will print 2, then 3. It seems like it should be true sometimes, so it's a good comment, but there seem to be a lot of practical cases where you can ignore it.
Jul
1
revised short form for string.format(…,**locals())
switch locals with globals to make locals take priority
Jul
1
comment short form for string.format(…,**locals())
good point... i'll make that change.
Jun
9
comment Pointing pip to the correct Python interpreter on Windows
on windows: set PATH=c:/new/path;%PATH%. you could put this into two batch files, pip32 and pip64 or something like that.
Jun
9
comment Pointing pip to the correct Python interpreter on Windows
is there a pip in the 2.7.9 folder\Scripts? if there is, try running that... if not, then try installing pip into that folder and then running it. one of two things should happen (can't test now): pip either installs into the python it's attached to, or the python that's first on the path. you can control both of those.
Jun
9
comment Pointing pip to the correct Python interpreter on Windows
when you type 'where pip', where is it running from?
May
25
awarded  Yearling
Apr
24
comment Can't set attributes on ElementTree.Element instance in Python 3
again: see the first link in my answer, and please check whether the python 3 object returned has a __dict__ attribute (and possibly equivalently, if it has a __slots__ attribute). Using __slots__ leads to much better memory performance, but has the side effect that you can't add attributes the normal way (and since etree is [was] a memory hog, this is exactly what i'd expect them to do). If it does have slots, you just need to declare them in your object as well, with a __slots__ declaration for the new fields you want, and then it should work. (if that's the problem..)
Apr
17
revised How should I handle inclusive ranges in Python?
formatting
Apr
17
comment How should I handle inclusive ranges in Python?
one other possibility... subclassing list and extending its __getitem__ functionality to handle sequences/tuples. then, you could pass in a range as your extraction object. e.g. right now, l = [0,1,2,3,4], l[2] gives 2, but l[2,3,4] is an error. Adding support so that l[2,3,4] gives [2,3,4] would not break any existing functionality (i don't think), and would let you do things like l[inclusive_range(2,4)] if that helps at all.
Apr
17
answered How should I handle inclusive ranges in Python?