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bio website thelowlyprogrammer.com
location Canada
age 27
visits member for 6 years
seen Aug 29 '13 at 15:27

I'm a software engineer at Google, working on the Doubleclick Ad Exchange. My blog is the place to start, if you want to know more about me.


Apr
26
comment Given two lines on a plane, how to find integer points closest to their intersection?
Well, it would give you an upper bound for distance in x and y, at any rate.
Apr
26
comment Given two lines on a plane, how to find integer points closest to their intersection?
I will happily edit it if someone can name a more specific category it falls in. It is certainly not ILP as a lot of people are claiming, so I wanted to be clear. Also, note that convex optimization problems require the objective function to be covex (ie for a given z, the points where f(x, y) <= z is a convex set) not just the feasible region, so it may not be as broad as you are thinking.
Apr
26
comment Given two lines on a plane, how to find integer points closest to their intersection?
As I noted on Alan's answer, this problem isn't linear (minimize x^2 + y^2), so it isn't strictly ILP, but rather Integer Convex Optimization. But it too is NP-complete, since ILP is a special case.
Apr
26
comment Given two lines on a plane, how to find integer points closest to their intersection?
It isn't quite ILP, however; finding the closest point requires minimizing x^2 + y^2, which isn't a linear equation. It is convex, however, so it falls into the general category of convex optimization. I haven't looked closely, but I would wager that the techniques for solving ILP by adding constraints can be generalized for solving Integer Convex Optimization as well.
May
25
comment Which cryptographic hash function should I choose?
I wouldn't put Skein and MD6 that high in the list; there is a reason that the SHA-3 competition won't be finished till the end of 2012. It takes a long time and a lot of eyes to be convinced that a hash function is actually likely to be secure, and neither of these functions have been around long enough for that yet.
Apr
25
comment Expressing an integer as a series of multipliers
Also, there is a bug with combine: it will not find the smallest combination. For example, {2,2,2,3,3} with y=9 will combine to {2,6,6} instead of {8,9}.
Apr
25
comment Expressing an integer as a series of multipliers
The concept for your solution seems correct, if overly complicated, however as you noted it is effectively the same as Yevgeny's (current) solution. The implementation has the same bug that his did: it will not find better solutions where the remainder is higher (eg x=27, y=5 gives 3*3*3+0, but a better solution is 5*5+2). Also, your GetTerms(...) method seems to be the actual implementation of the Combine() method, and the real implementation is missing.
Apr
25
comment Expressing an integer as a series of multipliers
One more thing: to find the true best decomposition you'll have to try all the remainders and see which gives the shortest output list. Eg x=27, y=5 gives 3*3*3+0, but a better solution is 5*5+2.
Apr
25
comment Expressing an integer as a series of multipliers
Only when there are 2 divisors, doesn't work for more.
Apr
25
comment Expressing an integer as a series of multipliers
He wants the least number of divisors possible, so you should change the for loop to go from Y to 2 instead of from 2 to Y so that the largest possible is always selected.
Apr
23
comment Why does .NET use int instead of uint in certain classes?
No, it would not change the performance of your program. To get answers like this, a microbenchmark is your friend (I recommend MeasureIt). On my computer adding uints seems to perform about 20% faster than ints (although measurements this small aren't too reliable). In general worrying about this would be considered optimizing prematurely; use whatever suits the situation best and optimize it later if it causes a measurable performance impact.
Apr
23
comment p/invoke C function that returns pointer to a struct
I did a bit of testing, and its a struct marshaled as LPStruct that doesn't work - I'll edit the post appropriately. Additionally, there is one more (fairly major) caveat: The memory pointed to (the SimpleStruct* in C code) needs to have been allocated by the CLR, since it adds a reference to it and will try to garbage collect it. I'll add this to the post as well. So it looks like you will have to go with the IntPtr approach.
Apr
20
comment live debugging a stack overflow
Heh, I just re-read your answer and I see your point :P. Oh well, probably worth being explicit that exceptions have the stack they were thrown from, in case it isn't obvious
Oct
2
comment How do I output progress messages from a SELECT statement?
Assuming you are using a weak form of acid that lets you see results mid-transaction that would work, yep.
Sep
24
comment How do I output progress messages from a SELECT statement?
I might give it a try anyways. add 'where row_id between ...' to the main table in the join, then loop for each partition. I can deal with it being a little slower, so we'll have to see just how much slower it is.
Sep
24
comment How do I output progress messages from a SELECT statement?
Nope, not using Toad. If it was going to be easy to partition the INSERT statements then I could get a progress update between them, but that doesn't work for INSERT INTO SELECT statements.
Sep
24
comment How do I output progress messages from a SELECT statement?
Hmm, thats a good point, I hadn't thought of it that way.
Sep
24
comment How do I output progress messages from a SELECT statement?
Thanks for the link, its quite an interesting read!
Sep
19
comment How do I convert between big-endian and little-endian values in C++?
The last function posted here is incorrect, and should be edited to: void swapByteOrder(unsigned long long& ull) { ull = (ull >> 56) | ... (ull << 56); }