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May
1
comment Haskell: why the convention to name a helper function “go”?
My vague recollection is that this is a Simon PJ-ism. I tend to use loop unless I'm modifying code that already uses the go convention. I always thought it was intended to mean literally "go", as in "go around the loop".
Apr
18
comment Improving treap implementation
More precisely, -H is a kind of "automatic -A", it increases the -A setting but without increasing the overall memory use. This is possible because we're doing copying GC, so between major GCs there's a lot of memory going unused. Increasing -A is not always a good idea - in some programs it will make things worse, due to increased cache misses.
Apr
11
comment Programming language for functional parallelism: F# vs Haskell
@Jon avoiding allocation is not a "solution". If your language implementation forces you to avoid allocation in order to get parallel speedup, that is a serious limitation. Maybe you should consider a different language :-)
Mar
31
comment Programming language for functional parallelism: F# vs Haskell
I think you're understating the value here. In a functional language it's much more likely that you can start with an idiomatically written program and parallelise it without mangling the code too much, or equivalently that you can write a parallel program that doesn't look too different from the idiomatic sequental one. Furthermore you're much more likely to get it right (fewer hazards to trip you up). It's not about absolute performance: it's about the tradeoff between performance, effort, maintainability, and robustness.
Mar
31
comment Programming language for functional parallelism: F# vs Haskell
Simon Peyton Jones dealt with this point head-on in his recent Function Programming eXchange talk, Managing parallelism: embrace diversity, but control side effects.
Mar
25
comment How to get nice syntax error messages with Happy?
It's not generally possible to do this, due to the way Happy works - it's a traditional LALR(1) table-based parser, and the information you need to generate the error is not easily available at runtime.
Feb
1
comment Haskell, GHC, win32, cairo
Could be a stdcall/ccall mismatch. Does the symbol name in the DLL have a suffix like @4?
Dec
5
comment pitfalls/disadvantages of functional programming
Parallelism /= HPC
Oct
9
comment Is it possible to use the GHC API to modify a program while compiling it?
I don't know of any specific examples, no.
Oct
4
comment Is it possible to define new ADTs in GHCi
It would need changes deeper in GHC I think; the GHC API doesn't provide enough functionality yet to implement this on top of it. It's not that difficult, just work.
Oct
4
comment Unsafe coerce and more efficient Agda code (-ftrust-me-im-agda)
Using a version of Maybe with the constructors reversed, so that Just has tag 1, is a legitimate workaround.
Oct
4
comment Unsafe coerce and more efficient Agda code (-ftrust-me-im-agda)
The problem is pointer-tagging: the representation of Just x is a pointer with 2 in its low bits, whereas Just1 x is a pointer with 1 in its low bits. The case continuation for a single-constructor datatype assumes that the tag bits are 1, and takes that into account when accessing the fields.
Oct
3
comment What is the Haskell response to Node.js?
@gawi I don't think that sounds very easy to program - without preemption, you have to deal with the possibility of starvation and long latencies. Basically threads are the right abstraction for a web server - there's no need to deal with asynchronous I/O and all the difficulties that go along with that, just do it in a thread. Incidentally, I wrote a paper about web servers in Haskell which you might find interesting: haskell.org/~simonmar/papers/web-server-jfp.pdf
Oct
2
comment What is the Haskell response to Node.js?
I don't know much about node.js, but one thing struck me about your question: why do you find the prospect of threads so unpleasant? Threads should be exactly the right solution to multiplexing I/O. I use the term threads broadly here, including Erlang's processes. Perhaps you're worried about locks and mutable state? You don't have to do things that way - use message-passing or transactions if that makes more sense for your application.
Sep
10
comment alternative to typeclasses?
@Jon of course it is. Monads aren't just for side-effects you know.
Sep
9
comment alternative to typeclasses?
@Jon Monad overloading?
Sep
6
comment Native newline characters?
Yes. The translation to \r\n will happen when you write the text to the file.
Sep
6
comment How does Haskell exception handling work?
I think the program also as a bug in its exception andler :-)
Aug
31
comment Haskell IO with non English characters
Data.Text is great, but the built-in IO system also provides locale-awareness and encoding support (since GHC 6.12).
Aug
27
comment Thread-ring benchmark
@iguoy "Instead, what task would pre-emptive threads perform faster" I'm not sure I understand what you're asking here. The point of pre-emption is that it's a more useful abstraction: the abstraction gives stronger fairness guarantees, so it's easier to program with in practice. Without pre-emption it's easy to accidentally write programs that deadlock. Most people want pre-emption when they use threads.