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seen Aug 12 at 9:24

Jul
14
comment What's the next step to learning Haskell after monads?
Forget the exotic stuff. Write code. Only when you have written enough code will you be able to appreciate how the more exotic abstractions can help. And even then, you'll most likely get along just fine without Arrows and Applicative: there are getting on for 100k lines of code in GHC and we never even use monad transformers.
Jul
12
comment How do typeclasses and modules interact?
sorry! hope the explanation suffices anyway.
Jul
12
comment How do typeclasses and modules interact?
You wrote module TwoDShapes (TwoDShape, ... which exported the type TwoDShape, but not its respresentation. However, even if you hadn't exported the type, you would still be able to export a function whose type mentioned TwoDShape, you just wouldn't be able to refer to TwoDShape anywhere else. The Haskell module system controls the visibility of identifiers, and that's all it does.
Jul
8
comment Haskell: How to write interactive interpreter on top of a State monad?
Since you have to be able to suspend and resume the monad, there's probably a solution involving MonadCont. I'm too lazy to try to get it to typecheck though. Good luck!
Jul
8
comment Collecting information about thread scheduling on Linux
ok, thanks, I'll look into it.
Jul
8
comment Collecting information about thread scheduling on Linux
thanks, I know about perf, what I really wanted was pointers to APIs I can use to get the information from my own code.
Jul
7
comment Space leak in list program
Profiling would tell you that the leak was in sequence and/or the definition of (>>=) for lists, and that the leak is composed of list cells. Beyond that, you have to reason about how sequence on lists works to understand why it leaks. However, note that this leak is not caused by lazy evaluation - the same function in a strict language would leak in the same way. The leak is not inherent in sequence or the list monad, but in the combination of the two. Maybe we can specialise sequence on lists to a non-leaky version, I'll think about that.
Jul
6
comment GHC's RTS options for garbage collection
Don't forget you can get a quick heap profile by just running your program with +RTS -h, no need to recompile for profiling. This tells you the shape of the heap profile, and what is taking up the space, but doesn't tell you what part of the program created the data, for that you need to recompile for profiling.
Jul
4
comment GHC's RTS options for garbage collection
It's not that simple, unfortunately. If your program needs a lot of memory then it is more likely that using a larger -A or -H will help, but not always - the best thing to do is try it and see (use +RTS -s to measure). The most common performance issue that people see is when the program is creating a large amount of long-lived data in a short space of time (as your program does). In this situation, the generational GC assumption that "most objects die young" is invalid, and generational GC is hurting rather than helping. This is where using a large -A value often helps.
Jul
1
comment Functional Programming and Type Systems
@sepp2k true - can you think of a type system feature that is inherently limited to functional languages?
Jul
1
comment Mapping over IO in Haskell
and mapM_ runs in constant stack space, whereas mapM needs linear stack, similarly for sequence_ vs. sequence.