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Jan
25
revised Refactoring large constructors
added 38 characters in body
Jan
25
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
22
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Jan
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
18
comment Speeding up enumeration for large numbers of items
@vishnu it is only a performance problem if you don't need to iterate the entire list, but in this case it is guaranteed.
Jan
18
comment Speeding up enumeration for large numbers of items
@toadflakz You mention trying to remove duplicates using the filters before making the combinations... the easiest way to guarantee that would be to "Distinct" each sub-list of items beforehand, which can remove potentially a large raft of iterating.
Jan
18
comment Speeding up enumeration for large numbers of items
@VishnuPrasad That makes no sense.
Jan
18
comment Speeding up enumeration for large numbers of items
In theory you should see gains, but it depends on if the work can be chunked effectively. You might find gains doing that yourself because you know the make-up of the arrays, to create a series of Tasks that can be waited on, then collate the results. Also, you can pre-allocate arrays because you know or can calculate the eventual size (so you remove completely the cost of re-allocating and copying as you go, which will have a cost as the problem grows). Just FYI the best way to get a good answer from SO is to provide a complete working example of the problem.
Jan
18
comment Speeding up enumeration for large numbers of items
Can you provide a sample app around this? It's an interesting problem. Where are you seeing the worst performance? To me it seems it could be either of the three major activities (PreFilter, Combine, PostFilter). I see no reason why the parallel extensions wouldn't work for the combination step, it isn't mutating any shared state and simply yields a new list. As for ToList, I would say it should only be done once if you know you are going to iterate it multiple times.
Jan
18
comment Is there anyway to know if thread has released CPU?
Not sure. It could be that those threads have yet to be GC'd or returned to the pool, so when your parallel extensions code runs, it tries to grab many threads from the pool and starves it (or grabs less because 2 are unavailable). Can't really tell without digging deeper using some diagnostic tools.
Jan
18
comment ToArray() in C# changing the order of the items in the list
Without the code it's kinda hard to tell...
Jan
18
comment Get Text From file C#
Well would you look at that, fantastic.
Jan
18
comment Get Text From file C#
This seems to get you started, but it only seems to match the first one in an online regex tester: regex101.com
Jan
18
comment Is there anyway to know if thread has released CPU?
Oh I see, you are saying if you include those then extra time is taken. I would assume because threads are not free. It takes time to allocate the thread from pool, assign the worker function, and then start the thread - at which point the OS takes over and allocates the thread to a CPU. There are various background activities going on, such as waiting for time-slices and potential context switches going on. These details are abstracted from your view of the thread's world.
Jan
18
comment Get Text From file C#
Please wait patiently for a regex guru to turn up and do this in one line.
Jan
18
comment Is there anyway to know if thread has released CPU?
I don't see how the two sections correlate to each other. This question is not presented very well.
Jan
15
comment Is there an await statement for threads?
Sounds like TPL DataFlow to me :-)
Jan
13
comment debugging with monodevelop from client
I thought MonoDevelop supported breakpoints, and there is a play button on the toolbar for starting. Says here "Integrated Debugger" monodevelop.com/screenshots
Jan
11
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22
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