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Jun
4
revised how to convert foreach loop into For loop
edited body
Jun
4
comment how to convert foreach loop into For loop
@UmarAbbas Why? You will be iterating at least once anyway to get the enumerable into an indexed collection, so now you are simply iterating it twice. Stick with the foreach and do it once. Or better yet, tell us what you are trying to do with that "requirement" and a better answer might be available.
Jun
4
comment how to convert foreach loop into For loop
@Georgi You cannot use a for loop over an IEnumerable without a little extra legwork...
Jun
4
comment From anemic domain to domain driven
@Lucian I wasn't quite suggesting that, but situations where entity boundaries are crossed might be due to needing to relocate the aggregate root. Cohesion between logically separated entities can be handled by services at the domain layer.
Jun
4
comment From anemic domain to domain driven
In this case it looks like the logic relates to child entities of this entity, so should be managed by this entity also. A parent is responsible for it's children (unfortunately ;-)
Jun
4
comment From anemic domain to domain driven
@BenAaronson True, but the other assumption with properties is that the backing code is lightweight, and the assumption with domain entities is that they manage validity - both of which are implementation details and the responsibility of the entity. Implementation details can change in future so coding a reliance on them is a risk. This is where the argument for the main difference being discipline comes in. Though as with everything, there are times when anaemic models are perfectly good design choices, not everything needs a 100% true DDD approach.
Jun
4
comment From anemic domain to domain driven
@BenAaronson If the situation were that a single property can be changed and it leaves the model valid, then there is little difference. The only meaningful difference is discipline. You can change a property Surname = "Houldsworth" or you can have a method for it such as ChangeSurname("Houldsworth"). The functional difference is nothing, the expressive difference is that you are asking the model to change its state based on a request, thus responsibility appears to be the models. Expressiveness is higher priority than implementation in a good domain model.
Jun
4
comment From anemic domain to domain driven
My first piece of advice when considering the domain model is to forget about persistence, it muddies the waters. If you have a piece of logic that spans entities, the answer may be a higher-level aggregate root or a domain-level "service".
Jun
4
comment How can I create a new instance of ImmutableDictionary?
@JonSkeet I think I remember reading somewhere a discussion about their usage being in a more disparate situation where you are slowly building up a collection via an iterative process or whatnot (perhaps it being more expressive passing around an immutable collection builder versus a straight mutable collection), whereas the extension methods force you to use a standard collection type as an intermediary and then at the end create the immutable type from it. But yes, the more it is looked into the more it appears to be lacking. Hopefully in the next version: stick your oar in :-)
Jun
4
comment How can I create a new instance of ImmutableDictionary?
@JonSkeet Yeah I agree generally, but I think with the extension methods the problem is fairly limited.
Jun
4
comment How can I create a new instance of ImmutableDictionary?
@JonSkeet The builder has an AddRange method for key value pairs, which is pretty close to the constructor for it, but I think by this point it'd be easier to use the extension methods that were also published with the library.
Jun
4
comment How can I create a new instance of ImmutableDictionary?
Collection initialiser for the builder ;-) of course, I jest.
Jun
4
comment How can I create a new instance of ImmutableDictionary?
Yeah, a little irritating, but at the same time that is something that the developer can encapsulate themselves in a helper class or something.
Jun
4
awarded  Yearling
Jun
2
comment Iterate through triple nested dictionary
@D Stanley Ah, it is missing a final .Select(kvp => kvp.Value) to get the IEnumerable<string> return. And it assumes the type you are iterating is something like: Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, string>>>.
Jun
2
comment Iterate through triple nested dictionary
@Xiaoy312 I'm not so sure, the item in the SelectMany will be a KeyValuePair<Key, Value> so the property is Value. It will return an IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, string>>.
Jun
2
comment C# - Virtual, Override - Execution Path
@Stijn Could always edit the answers.
May
30
comment Change the short date pattern of DateTime.ToString() method in .NET
All the formatting options are detailed here. For month, the format key is "M", little "m" is actually for minutes.
May
28
comment Avoid explicit type casting when overriding inherited methods
@RobertKoritnik That implies that you are able to write this once and re-use many times using some other solution. If you have many different abstract base classes, whatever solution you provide for one will need replicating anyway, unless they all derived from some master object, at which point I'd back away from the object hierarchy and rethink.
May
28
comment Avoid explicit type casting when overriding inherited methods
@JamesBarrass You are defining your model as a need to be able to specify specific snakes. In this case, the recurring template pattern becomes slightly more unsustainable than the original use case, there are only a very small handful of situations where it is useful. I tend to not use it. As for the non-generic Snake case, you can simply define a derived class that is UnknownSnake or GeneralSnake to inherit Snake<T>, though by this point I would be abandoning the self-referencing constraint.