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comment Do Java 8 default methods break source compatibility?
...such a list could usefully share with ArrayList<T>, other than the interface List<T>.
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comment Do Java 8 default methods break source compatibility?
@bayou.io: While I agree that in most cases code that wants to sort a list will know its exact type (typically ArrayList) but there can sometimes be considerable performance advantage to using other forms of backing storage. For example, if one has an immutable list type, it may be useful for it to include an asMutable method that returns a List<T> which holds a reference to the immutable list along with some arrays which keep track of what has been changed. Code shouldn't need to care whether it receives such a list or an ArrayList, but I don't know what common supertype...
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comment Is it good practice to document thrown exceptions for interfaces?
...in the framework for things like reading lines of text from a file, are there not? What should such an enumerator do if it gets a disk error?
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comment Is it good practice to document thrown exceptions for interfaces?
@InBetween: The "promise" implied by specifying CleanEnumerationFailureException is that an implementation should refrain from throwing exceptions besides those documented unless, in its "judgment", a situation exists which needs to be handled in some fashion beyond reporting "The collection could not be fully enumerated", and callers should handle CleanEnumerationFailureException if they judge that they can function usefully despite a failure to fully enumerate the collection. The issue isn't just with user enumerators; I think there are enumerators...
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comment Do Java 8 default methods break source compatibility?
@bayou.io: Comparing and conditionally swapping two items of an array is apt to be much faster than loading two items from a List<T>, comparing them, and if necessary storing two items back to the List<T>. It is not uncommon for programs to spend a significant amount of their time sorting, and having a List<T> sort itself may often offer a 50% or better speedup compared to implementing a sort that has to read and write items in a List<T>.
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comment Do Java 8 default methods break source compatibility?
@bayou.io: If it is possible to perform a complex action using nothing but "primitive" interface methods, but some implementations of the interface may, with the aid of their knowledge of their own internals, be able to perform the action much more efficiently than would be possible using primitive methods alone, then having a method to perform such action, and having a default implementation which performs the action using only interface primitives, is IMHO the best way to do things (though it would've been better if the such methods existed from the start, rather than being added later).
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comment Is it good practice to document thrown exceptions for interfaces?
...in the latter scenario (e.g. CleanEnumerationFailureError) with an InnerException describing the underlying problem. Otherwise there's no way for client code to know what problems require handling beyond reporting that enumeration ended rudely.
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comment Is it good practice to document thrown exceptions for interfaces?
@InBetween: I would consider IEnumerator<T> as an example of an interface whose failure to adequately document exceptions creates a certain level of unresolvable semantic ickiness. Many kinds of problems can occur while enumerating something; some are sufficiently severe that shutting down the program ASAP may be appropriate; others imply that the consumer should be aware that enumeration ended abnormally, but that if a client can deal with that there is no other problem. I would posit that IEnumerator<T> really should have documented that it will throw a particular exception...
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comment Rationale for pointer comparisons outside an array to be UB
...undocumented aspects of its behavior, such as a delay between when it sees a certain input and when it triggers a certain output). Being able to engineer something with new parts that can serve as a drop-in replacement for something built with old parts is very useful in the real world. I'm not sure what you mean by "no sound reason".
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comment Rationale for pointer comparisons outside an array to be UB
@Lundin: Nothing in the Standard requires that comparisons of integer representations yield the same results as comparisons of pointers, even in scenarios where the latter are well-defined. Embedded programmers often need to be able to tweak existing designs. If a product has been selling well for ten years and people keep buying it, but a part becomes unavailable, being able to use the existing code with new parts may be preferable to rewriting everything from scratch. That may be especially true for products that need to interact with other equipment (which may depend upon some...
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comment Why and when to use static structures in C programming?
@fvu: I like the improved text. Another point to mention about static variables used within a function is that it's sometimes good to define a parameter or combination of parameter values that can be used to "reset" the values. Having all access to some variables be confined to a function can make it easier to reason about them, but if no provision is made to reset them when the function is written, it may be difficult to add one in if it later becomes necessary to run the function multiple times "from scratch" (as may be common in some test scenarios).
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comment Is the backslash acceptable in C and C++ #include directives?
...in an unoptimized one (e.g. an optimizer may realize that for (int i=0; i<size; i++) if (ptr1+i==ptr2) return 1; is equivalent to what an unoptimized compiler on most platforms would yield for if (ptr2>=ptr1 && ptr2<ptr1+i) return 1;, but if compiler settings would guarantee the two forms equivalent the latter wouldn't need optimization to perform decently. There may be some modules where pruning certain forms of UB could improve performance, but there are certainly others where defining certain forms of presently-UB could allow more sensible code than outlawing them.
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comment Is the backslash acceptable in C and C++ #include directives?
@Potatoswatter: What do you think of the notion of replacing many other forms of UB with "conditionally-supported behavior", and adding a means by which code can test support (and either use alternative slower algorithms or refuse compilation when unavailable)? Many compilers have command-line switches which define behaviors in cases where the Standard does not, but there is at present no way for source code to confirm that the switches are set suitably. Further, in some cases, the code required to achieve correctness in an optimized build may be horribly and needlessly inefficient...
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comment Is there a clean portable way to “build” include-file names
@Dmitri: Different vendors have different expectations about how things will be laid out. If some libraries from different vendors are both dependent upon a .h file from the main chip vendor, and one of them writes #include "../cmq/cmq.h", another #include "cmq/cmq.h", and a third #include "cmq.h"` how should one keep them straight?
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revised Is modifying the pointed value and the pointer at the same time UB
added 213 characters in body
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comment Is there a clean portable way to “build” include-file names
@user3629249: While prefixing all library includes with library-specific prefixes might be a good convention, it doesn't seem terribly common. If two libraries both include a file e.g. libtypes.h but expect different contents, reconciling them will require hacking the files that use one or the other. If the author of FooLib could change the header so that defining FOOLIB_PATH would cause the compiler to look there for FooLib-related includes, such conflicts could be resolved without having to hack any vendor-supplied files.
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comment Is there a clean portable way to “build” include-file names
@user3629249: What should one do if a project needs to make use of two libraries from different vendors which happen to use identically-named nested .h files?
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comment Why does gcc not give a warning at undefined behaviour in code inside?
Aborting the program would be positively benign compared with some hyper-modern compilers' treatment of Undefined Behavior. The Standard says that once a program has received input that would make Undefined Behavior inevitable, the compiler may generate the wackiest behavior imaginable without violating the standard; hyper-modern compiler philosophy encourages compilers to exploit that freedom to the utmost.
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comment Why does gcc warn “assuming signed overflow” in one case and not in the other
@hvd: The difference isn't just conceptual. Given -fno-strict-overflow but not -fwrapv, code like int m=INT_MAX; long long L=m+1; might arbitrarily set L to INT_MAX+1L, -INT_MAX-1, or possibly some other values, but would not negate the laws of time and causality. Without -fno-strict-overflow, anything could happen.
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answered Why does GCC emit a warning when using trigraphs, but not when using digraphs?