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Aug
14
comment How to Call Static parameterless constrcutor in structure?
It may be worthwhile to note that while it's not possible to access a class instance field before the class static constructor has run, that is not true of structure instance fields. Class instance fields don't exist until the containing instance is created, which in turn won't happen until after the class constructor has run, but structure fields can come into existence without the type's involvement, and once they exist they can be accessed--again without the type's involvement.
Aug
14
answered C# struct and class variable value
Aug
14
answered Why Object clone() method available only to classes that implement Cloneable interface?
Aug
14
comment Why C# fails to compare two object types with each other but VB doesn't?
@JohnMGant: A coder that doesn't understand the significance of reference identity may be able to write code that happens to work, but is unlikely to really know what things can safely be changed, what changes will always break things, and what changes may appear to work but cause unwanted nasty side-effects (e.g. causing what should be references to different mutable objects that have the same state to instead be references to the same object). If objects are seldom mutated, such a change may not cause any immediate problems, but may make hard-to-find bugs spring up later.
Aug
14
answered In VB .net, When i use ByRef value, always occur runtime error help me
Aug
14
answered Why do we need a lock to be reentrant?
Aug
14
comment How do calculators work with precision?
...will in many cases end up requiring an "extra" digit; even then, the large variance in precision can often cause problems of its own.
Aug
14
comment How do calculators work with precision?
The relative precision indicated by a decimal number that's shown with e.g. six significant figures may vary from about one part per million (if the mantissa is 9.99999) to ten parts per million (if 1.00000), a nearly-tenfold variation. The relative precision of binary floating point numbers only varies by a factor of two. Thus, for the binary representation to be as accurate as the decimal in all cases, it must be ten (if not twenty) times as accurate in some cases. Using BCD doesn't really help, though; to ensure a certain level of relative precision in all intermediate calculations...
Aug
14
comment comparing float/double values using == operator
Ick. Not only is that code horribly slow, it's also apt to be just plain wrong in a lot of cases. If one is comparing e.g. x to (y-z), the tolerance needs to be based upon the size of y and z, not the size of the difference, and there's no way for code like the above to take that into consideration. Exact equality testing between x and y is often appropriate if e.g. one has computed f(x) and wants to know if one should bother computing f(y) [or simply use the value of f(x)]. Unfortunately, exact equality testing is often difficult, though the == operator is good enough in most cases.
Aug
14
answered Reference type in C#
Aug
14
comment How can a computer create “if” statements using only ones and zeros
..."operation ADD", and "register 6 store". One would "save" a program either by hand-copying a diagram of the wiring, or taking a photograph of it, and "load" a program by stringing the appropriate wires again.
Aug
14
comment How can a computer create “if” statements using only ones and zeros
Computers which ran electronically-stored programs were pretty advanced. Computers before that were often programmed using wires. A that could run a 32-step program using 8 registers and had 8 operations it could perform might have four attachment points for each allowable program step, three points for each register (fetch op1, fetch op2, and store), and a socket for each allowable operation. If step 3 was supposed to add register 3 to register 5 and store the result to register 6, wires would connect the "step 3" attachment points to "register 3 fetch1", "register 5 fetch2", ...
Aug
14
answered Check if a type implements a generic interface without considering the generic type arguments
Aug
14
comment Atomic operations in ARM strex and ldrex - can they work on I/O registers?
To my mind, in a well-designed part, it should be possible to perform any desired action on any peripheral without having to worry about the state of any other peripheral. Not only does such ability simplify user code, but it also makes it possible to mix and match routines from different sources without having to worry about them interfering. It saddens me that some companies spend a lot of money on development systems to let people configure hardware and auto-generate driver code with graphical tools, but have hardware share registers among peripherals in awkward ways.
Aug
14
comment Atomic operations in ARM strex and ldrex - can they work on I/O registers?
It would be nice if hardware designers gave consistent thought to issues surrounding concurrency, rather than e.g. having write-one-to-clear values share addresses with latched values. I wonder why so few parts allow one to e.g. switch the direction of some bits on a port while leaving others unaffected. It should be very cheap in hardware [omit two address bits (e.g. A2-A3) from the decode logic for the DDR, and then have each bit Rn compute (Rn & (!A2 | Dn)) | (A3 & Dn). Address 01xx will clear any bits written as zeroes; 10xx will set any bits written as ones, and 11xx will do both.
Aug
13
answered rationale behind Java's exception hierarchy
Aug
13
comment Under what circumstance would you want your child class to avoid serializable if parent is serializable?
There's more to it than that, since a reference of type SerializableDerivedFoo should be substitutable for either DerivedFoo or SerializableFoo, even though neither of those types is substitutable for the other. One could use interfaces for those purposes, but that would require maintaining a hierarchy of interfaces in addition to the hierarchy of implementing classes.
Aug
13
comment Under what circumstance would you want your child class to avoid serializable if parent is serializable?
...and have that type be substitutable both for a [not-necessarily-publicly-serializable] DerivedFoo and for "a publicly-serializable Foo". The only way for a publicly-serializable DerivedFoo to be substitutable for a publicly-serializable Foo is for it to inherit from that; the only non-serializable types that DerivedFoo could inherit from would be ancestors of Foo itself.
Aug
13
comment Under what circumstance would you want your child class to avoid serializable if parent is serializable?
The problem, I think, stems from the fact that while there isn't a general need for multiple inheritance, there are a few places where single inheritance isn't sufficient to define what should be allowable substitutions. For example, if inheritable class Foo offers protected serialization methods (implying that it isn't publicly serializable, but derived classes might be), and DerivedFoo does likewise, and Foo and DerivedFoo have sealed serializable derivatives, it would be helpful to have a type which represented "a publicly-serializable DerivedFoo"...
Aug
13
answered Why doesn't ArrayDeque override equals() and hashCode()?