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Nov
27
comment What method definition should I use for creating an extension method on IEquatable<T>
Are there any Framework types that implement IEquatable for anything other than themselves, or is there anyplace where Microsoft recommends such an implementation? Note that while IEquatable<T> could have been contravariant with respect to T, Microsoft didn't declare it that way, likely because even though interface could theoretically support contravariance, it shouldn't be used with inheritable classes.
Nov
27
comment How to prevent a method caller from modifying a returned collection?
@DanielBrückner: What real advantage does that have over wrapping in a ReadOnlyCollection<T> and casting to IEnumerable<T>? The fact that the resulting object can be cast to IList<T> will enormously improve the performance of some Linq methods like Count and Last.
Nov
27
answered why integer.equals(string) gives false when both contian same value , but does not throw type mismatch exception
Nov
27
answered Declaring/passing structs vs. declaring/passing individual values
Nov
27
comment Confusion with IDisposable
In some cases, an object which receives a parameter of a type which implements IDisposable will accept the responsibility for calling Dispose on it. The key concept underlying IDisposable is "will the last one to leave the room please turn out the lights". At any given time, it should be possible to identify precisely one object which has responsibility for cleaning up each IDisposable; that responsibility starts with its creator, but may be handed off if the creator makes the object for the benefit of some other object and no longer needs it itself.
Nov
27
answered Calling Properties from Struct in c#
Nov
27
comment ref and out parameters in C# and cannot be marked as variant
...would be cleaner. Further, properties could safely be passed to methods which have explicit in-out parameters (as distinct from those with ref parameters), by reading the property, making the call, and then writing it back.
Nov
27
comment ref and out parameters in C# and cannot be marked as variant
@EricLippert: There are things which can only be done with true ref parameters. The big problem is not that ref parameters exist, but rather that read-write ref parameters are the only alternative to value-in parameters, and there aren't any copy-out, in-out, and read-only-ref parameters. A related problem is that there is no way for methods to specify how this should be passed; the fact that it is passed by value for class types and by ref for structs means that heap-stored objects must have reference semantics even in cases where value semantics (using immutable heap objects)...
Nov
25
comment Mutable or immutable closures
I find it curious that Microsoft had QBasic default to passing parameters by reference, and versions of Visual Basic through VB6 did likewise until vb.net decided that passing by value was a better default, and yet despite that Microsoft decided closures should implicitly grab variables by reference. Frankly, I'm somewhat dubious about closures implicitly capturing variables at all (explicit declaration of the variables to be captured and how they should be captured would seem better), but having captures alter the semantics of the calling code's variables seems especially dodgy.
Nov
25
comment Immutable views of mutable types
There's no such thing as an immutable struct type; in your example, any code that had access to _version.Value and wanted to arbitrarily rewrite it could say _version = new ReadOnly<string>(); _version.Value = whatever;. Even if one added a parameterized constructor to a ReadOnly<T> struct and offered no other method of mutatation, a field of type ReadOnly<T> would offer no more protection than a field of type T.
Nov
25
answered When creating an immutable type in .net is it valid to have public fields?
Nov
25
comment Algorithms for determining the key of an audio sample
@SigTerm: On many pipe organs, there are stops labeled 2 2/3' and 1 3/5' which produce pitches that represent the third and fifth harmonics of a stop at 8'. If one draws just those those two stops and plays a melody in C major, and on the other manual one draws a quiet 8' stop and plays the appropriate chords in C major, the perception will be of a melody played in C major, even if what one is actually hearing will be the melody played in G major and E major.
Nov
25
comment Chord detection algorithms?
Trying to recognize chords may be easier in some ways than the general problem of trying to recognize pitches, since at least for triads and seventh chords it won't matter too much which octaves the various notes are in. In chords which are neither augmented nor diminished, if there is a pitch which seems to have a much stronger third harmonic than any other, it's very likely that pitch is the root (and a big portion of the "third harmonic" is the fifth). If there isn't a pitch with a strong third harmonic, the fifth of the chord is likely either a fifth above or a fourth below the root.
Nov
25
comment ref and out parameters in C# and cannot be marked as variant
@JeppeStigNielsen: Conceptually, it should be possible for a compiler to allow variable Foo of type Animal to be passed to an out parameter of type Dog by passing a temporary variable of type Dog to the routine and then copying that to Foo once the routine exists. Conceptually, that's what out should mean anyhow. Unfortunately, the creators of .net didn't want to require languages to implement out parameters, and thus .net cannot make any assumptions that would break if a function's caller treated out as ref.
Nov
25
comment Why is conversion between with different type parameters is NOT allowed?
If casting operators could be generic, it could make sense to have code such as described be equivalent to Stack<Itype> stack = Stack<IType>.ConvertFrom<SomeType>(new Stack<SomeType>);, with the conversion method implying suitable constraint on SomeType. It's worth noting that if Stack<T> is immutable, the conversion may make sense and be type-safe even if Stack<T> is not covariant with respect to T (e.g. it has a Contains method which accepted a T: testing whether a Stack<Cat> contains an instance of Dog shouldn't crash--it should just return false).
Nov
25
comment Why covariance does not work with generic method
@JeppeStigNielsen: ...a problem if one wanted to have a struct implement IEnumerator<T>, but not a problem if one wanted to have a struct which was only used with duck-typed ForEach.
Nov
25
comment Why covariance does not work with generic method
@JeppeStigNielsen: Actually, another thing that would have helped ease the confusion would have been to have the For Each and foreach in vb.net and C# check for the existence of a GetDuckTypedEnumerator() method before GetEnumerator, using the former if it exists. That would allow a class to have GetEnumerator return a class-type IEnumerator<T> and have GetDuckTypeEnumerator return a struct which does not implement IEnumerator<T>. If boxed types are going to have Equals report value equality (it can't report reference equality), they should be immutable. That would be...
Nov
25
comment Why covariance does not work with generic method
@JeppeStigNielsen: You are correct. The problem is that a struct which implements a mutating interface will have struct semantics, but if cast to that interface it will become (and behave as) a reference type with a broken Equals method. While it's useful to have a concept of interfaces that can be implemented by value types, I'm not sure it's useful to say that a boxed structure implicitly implements the interfaces of the original; it might be more useful to allow structures to define casts to interfaces (where the cast would yield a new object which does implement the interface).
Nov
24
answered FFT for Pitch Detection
Nov
23
answered In a managed environment why do we need IDisposable