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Aug
17
comment Should I use a struct or a class to represent a Lat/Lng coordinate?
FYI, one possible reason for using an interface might be to allow for the possibility of different coordinate systems. One could have a method which given e.g. an ILatLng, would return an IGridCoordinate by checking whether the passed-in instance implemented the latter type and, if not, creating an object which would wrap the original one and implement both interfaces, doing numerical conversion as needed. Repeatedly conversions between LatLong and GridCoordinate struct types could cause progressive rounding errors, but interface-based conversions, done properly, would not.
Aug
17
comment Does wrapping orthogonal struct fields in value-agnostic read-write properties serve a purpose
I understand the 'maintaining a general guideline' notion for class fields, since there are many ways one might want to add behavior (such as data binding) to a field-like characteristic of a class. The fact that fields can be used in ways that properties cannot may be seen as an argument for or against wrapping class fields. My question is whether there's any logical reason to extend such a guideline to struct fields, given that structs and classes are different.
Aug
17
asked Does wrapping orthogonal struct fields in value-agnostic read-write properties serve a purpose
Aug
17
comment Immutable struct with collection
(Actually, thinking about it, even having a caller pass in a List<T> wouldn't be great, since the caller would still have to copy the contents to an array in order to pass them to any of the framework methods that require arrays. I wonder what "the next popular framework" will be, and if it will include a proper immutable-array type?
Aug
17
comment Immutable struct with collection
...the best I can really do is rely upon the caller to refrain from writing the array. Having the class return a new defensively-copied array instance with each call would be icky. Having the caller pass in a List<T> (the size is variable) would be decent semantically, but bad from a performance standpoint. Wrapping the thing in a ReadOnlyCollection and forcing callers to copy it to an array so they can pass it to code that wants an array but isn't going to modify it is clunky and slow. I really wish .net had included an immutable array type--that would have been clean.
Aug
17
comment Immutable struct with collection
...array references, and recompute the arrays the next time they're requested. There may be hundreds of requests for the same array between updates, so returning the same array instance is helpful. If Array inherited from ReadableArray, which also had child ImmutableArray (whose constructor could either take a ReadableArray, an IEnumerable<T>, or lists of initialization contents and ranges, and if routines that just needed to read an array were written to accept the base type rather than Array, then I would probably have used ImmutableArray. As no such pattern exists in .net ...
Aug
17
comment Immutable struct with collection
@jpbochi: I've written some classes with a property ArrayAsReadOnly. Because some of the code which uses the property will pass it to methods which need an array, and because copying the array all the time would be expensive, the property does expose the array itself (potentially lazily creating it) but rely upon the classes that use it (all of which, at least for now, were written by me) not to mess with it. As it happens, the arrays in question are not what the class uses to actually store its data; most updates will cause the class to invalidate its...
Aug
17
comment Volatile vs. Interlocked vs. lock
@ZachSaw: I was responding to your second comment; though it was written awhile ago, I just wanted to clarify for the benefit of future readers that interlocked operations are lock-free on modern CPUs which include hardware to prevent bus locks from being held indefinitely.
Aug
17
comment Can competing atomic operations starve one another?
Depending upon how the CAS is used, it may often be possible to ensure that no task will be blocked except when some other task makes forward progress. If the set of work to be done is finite, such assurance will in turn mean that every task will eventually complete. The maximum time for any particular task to complete may be computed as a function of the total amount of work that will arrive. In a starvation-free system, the time for a task to complete once it starts would be bounded even if the work load is not, but having time bounded relative to workload is still useful.
Aug
17
comment Missing expected commands from .Net System.Threading.Interlocked
@IanC: I suspect much of the reason that .net doesn't offer more interlocked methods is that CompareExchange can be used to emulate them (note that CompareExchange itself cannot be emulated perfectly by compare-and-swap, since an attempt to read data following a failed compare-and-swap might not yield the data which was stored at the time the compare failed.
Aug
17
comment Missing expected commands from .Net System.Threading.Interlocked
@IanC: All the interlocked primitives other than CompareExchange may be emulated on a platform which can perform, at minimum, a compare-and-swap operation (the latter, which would be better called "comare-and-store", acts like CompareExchange except that the return value simply indicates whether the store succeeded, rather than returning the value that caused its unexpected failure). For e.g. atomic add, one would read the value, compute the new value, attempt to compare-and-swap the old value with the new value, and reloop if the compare-and-swap fails.
Aug
16
answered How are CIL 'fault' clauses different from 'catch' clauses in C#?
Aug
15
answered Why does an array of classes consume ~20% more memory than array of structs?
Aug
15
comment Why does Microsoft advise against readonly fields with mutable values?
@Weeble: What would be useful would be a means of specifying that more than one type of reference could exist to a class object, and that different properties should be accessible based upon the type of the reference. I would expect that one could in theory allow up to four types of references reasonably efficiently if the address stored in each object reference was 1/4 the actual start address of the object, freeing up the upper two bits to identify the reference type. I really doubt Microsoft will ever do such a thing, though.
Aug
15
comment Why does Microsoft advise against readonly fields with mutable values?
The contents of a readonly field are immutable. The contents of a field of class type identify an object (or null). The contents of a readonly field of class type will always continue to identify the same object as they did when the containing object was created, as long as any reference to that containing object exists anywhere in the universe.
Aug
15
comment Why make defensive copies in getters inside immutable classes?
@iozee: Yeah. The caller supplies the container in which the data is supposed to go, and the called function copies it there. One thing I like about this approach is that it makes it clear that changes made to the caller's container after the method returns will not affect the underlying data source. By contrast, if the caller returns an object, it will be unclear what effect future changes to that object will have on anything.
Aug
15
comment Immutable set in .NET
@MerlynMorgan-Graham: The state of an immutable set of some class-object type is the collection of the identities of the objects referred to thereby. If I have a list of five cars' Vehicle Identification Numbers printed on tamper-evident paper, it will always refer to the same five cars. The list should not be regarded as saying anything about where the cars are, what color they are, how many miles they've driven, etc. All of those characteristics of cars are mutable. The fact that many properties of a car can change, however, does not make the list of cars any less immutable.
Aug
15
comment Immutable collection in C# that supports (String-like) methods such as “Contains(IEnumerable<T>)”?
@d4wn: ...be written as MyThing WithColor(Color newColor) {var temp = data; temp.Color = newColor; return new MyThing(temp);}. Note that the method associated with a property need not know anything about any other fields or properties of MyThing, nor any other fields within the structure. Using that approach, the new thing would never have to be mutable outside its constructor. The only other approach I can think of that would allow such methods to be written without each method having to know all the properties of the object would be to use MemberwiseClone and private set--icky.
Aug
15
comment Immutable collection in C# that supports (String-like) methods such as “Contains(IEnumerable<T>)”?
@d4wn: The blog post doesn't offer any mechanism for enforcing the very common scenario in which an immutable type holds the only extant reference to a mutable type, but doesn't mutate it (any immutable type containing an array must meet this pattern). It also disparages exposed-field structs despite their great advantages when working with immutable classes (e.g. if the data for a class is wrapped in a struct and it includes a (possibly private) constructor that accepts an instance of that struct type, a method to return a class instance with a different value for some property can...
Aug
15
answered Can spi protocol used on communication between two mcu?