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May
9
answered Instead of error, why don't both operands get promoted to float or double?
May
9
comment Literals and implicit narrowing conversions
The rules regarding floating-point conversion are backward, but they are what they are. There's no good reason why float f = (float)(1.0 / 10.0); should require a typecast (f will hold the most precise representation of 0.1 possible for its type), but double d = 1.0f / 10.0f; will compile without a warning even though the value assigned to d is (with regard to the precision of a double) nowhere near 0.1.
May
9
comment Why does C# compiler does not complain with Overflow for this obvious 'bad' casting?
Curious that long is implicitly convertible to float, but double isn't, notwithstanding the fact that for every possible double value, there is exactly one "best" float value, and a long can lose a lot of precision in the conversion. Actually, I'd posit that conversions from float to double are more apt to be buggy than double to float. For example, float f = (float)(1.0 / 10.0); is correct within half a least-significant bit, while double d = 1.0f / 10.0f; is off by millions.
May
9
comment Proper use of the IDisposable interface
If an instance of LargeStuff has been around long enough to make it to Generation 2, and if _Large holds a reference to a newly-created string which is in Generation 0, then if the the instance of LargeStuff is abandoned without nulling out _Large, then string referred to by _Large will be kept around until the next Gen2 collection. Zeroing out _Large may let the string get eliminated at the next Gen0 collection. In most cases, nulling out references is not helpful, but there are cases where it can offer some benefit.
May
9
comment Why can I still access a member of a struct after the pointer to it is freed?
@KeithThompson: I suspect that's to allow for the possibility that an implementation could have pointers that consist of something that identifies a block of memory along with an offset to that block. Such a design would be allowable by the standard, and would allow for trapping of many types of errant pointer access. If one didn't mind bloating pointer types out to 128 bits, it could probably consistently trap on use of out-of-scope pointers (assuming a 64-bit counter would never overflow).
May
9
comment Conceptual reason of the 'A field initializer cannot reference the non-static field, method, or property' CS0236 Error
It's worth noting that vb.net runs field initializers after base-object construction, and does allow them to reference the object being constructed. I consider this a good thing, especially in cases where an invariant relationship exists among fields. It would be even better if exposing constructor parameters to field initializers were less clunky.
May
9
comment why 'Sizeof' value differs from the number of bytes before the flexible-length member of a struct?
Is there any clean portable way of finding out how many bytes would have to be allocated for a structure with some number of items in a FAM? Should one add the offset of the FAM to the size of the items therein, and then round the result based upon the __alignof() of the structure?
May
9
comment Why can I still access a member of a struct after the pointer to it is freed?
@ChrisStratton: If you remove the lock from a public locker but leave your stuff inside, and then some time later you come back and look inside, it's possible your stuff will still be there. Or it might be some stuff that looks like yours but actually belongs to someone else who has similar taste. If you happen to find your stuff in the locker exactly as you last arranged it, the only "reason" it would be there arranged like that is that nobody as yet had happened to do anything else with the space.
May
9
comment Difference between Monitor.Pulse and Monitor.PulseAll
@JonSkeet: What if you can only handle one customer at a time, but might not always be able to handle some customers [e.g. all customers are waiting because the store is empty; a shipment comes in that contains something many customers would like, but it's possible that the first two might not be interested]. If each of the first two customers, on exiting the Wait, checks if it's interested in what's for sale and if not calls Pulse and Wait, is there any guarantee that anyone other than the first two customers will ever get served?
May
9
comment Why does Monitor.Pulse need locked mutex? (.Net)
...should die off at its earliest convenience. If the thread sometimes will Wait until it's given data, but may sometimes hold a lock for awhile, it would be helpful if the finalize method could set a "shutdown" flag and then give a pulse, without having to acquire the lock first. As it is, I know of no clean way to have the finalizer thread wake up the thread that's in the Wait without running the risk of its having to wait arbitrarily long to acquire the lock.
May
9
comment Why does Monitor.Pulse need locked mutex? (.Net)
@RickNZ: If the code that does a pulse sets a flag which could be cleared by code in the wait loop, the code that calls pulse needs to acquire the lock before setting those flags. It would seem semantically useful, however, to have a version of pulse which did not need to be within the lock, but which--if the lock is busy--would set a flag so that if the current holder of the lock calls wait before exiting the lock it would act as though it was pulsed immediately. For example, suppose a wrapper object is supposed to encapsulate a thread. If the wrapper is abandoned, the thread...
May
9
comment Creating a memory leak with Java
...and have the system provide notifications (via means similar to PhantomReference) if an object was found not to have anyone that cared about it. WeakReference comes somewhat close, but must be converted to a strong reference before it can be used; if a GC cycle occurs while the strong reference exists, the target will be assumed to be useful.
May
9
comment Creating a memory leak with Java
The GC in Java and .NET is in some sense predicated on the assumption graph of objects that hold references to other objects is the same as the graph of objects that "care about" other objects. In reality, it's possible that edges can exist in the reference graph that don't represent "caring" relations, and it's possible for an object to care about the existence of another object even if no direct or indirect reference path (even using WeakReference) exists from one to the other. If a object reference had a spare bit, it could be helpful to have a "cares about the target" indicator...
May
9
answered C# Timer and memory leak
May
9
answered Is it ok to use the text on a button to determine current state?
May
9
comment What important difference exists between Monitor.TryEnter(object) And Monitor.TryEnter(object, ref bool)?
@usr: Ah. I think of the scenario targeted by the hack as the "leak"-out scenario. I had thought your use of the term "sneak" was referring to my use of that term in the comment before yours. The pattern of having a method that acquires a resource ensure that it will be available for cleanup in a finally block is IMHO one that should be used routinely; adding it to the one specific case of Monitor.TryEnter doesn't seem as good as making it available for resources in general.
May
9
comment What important difference exists between Monitor.TryEnter(object) And Monitor.TryEnter(object, ref bool)?
@usr: I just saw your comment and was curious whether the JIT had changed in some way that would interfere with what I was doing. What sort of JIT hack were you talking about?
May
8
answered Mixing mark and sweep with reference counting
May
8
answered why 'Sizeof' value differs from the number of bytes before the flexible-length member of a struct?
May
8
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