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Jun
3
comment Monitor vs lock
@kizzx2: I wish .net would make it easier to implement what I would consider the proper locking pattern, which would be to have unexpected exceptions that exit a lock neither release the lock, nor leave it held, but instead invalidate it, such that any pending or future attempts to enter would throw immediate exceptions. That way, code which critically needs the locked resource would fail fast rather than wait indefinitely, and code which would benefit from the resource but doesn't really need it would get on with its work.
Jun
3
comment What assumptions should code make about CPU memory model, and how should such assumptions be documented?
I thought that a volatile field declaration in C# would not only prevent reordering, but also cause the compiler to add memory barriers to reads and writes, since there are times when memory barriers are needed, even under the x86 memory model.
Jun
3
comment Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
@nawfal: Boxed value-type objects behave like class types rather than value types; a Framework type which demonstrates this is List<T>.Enumerator. I wish System.ValueType had included virtual boxing and unboxing methods, since the semantics associated with implicit boxing and unboxing are not appropriate for all types.
Jun
3
comment Just when is a stackoverflow fair and sensible?
...and that having a thread die unexpectedly should be considered a Very Bad Thing, but having a delegate run in a new thread could resolve both issues.]
Jun
3
comment Just when is a stackoverflow fair and sensible?
I would conjecture that it's possible to blow the stack with a lot less than 500 frames, or to have 500 frames while the stack is less than 1% full. As for what to call the exception, I think something like StackLimitException might be good. If I had my druthers, such a thing would exist in the Framework for methods which declaratively requested stack-guarding code. Alternatively, I'd allow a thread to specify a delegate which should run in a new thread if a stack overflow occurs [I can understand that an unexpected stack overflow may not be recoverable on the thread where it occurs...
Jun
3
comment Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
@EricLippert: As for mounting an attack, it is certainly possible to construct instances of derived types that the base class isn't expecting. Personally, I think Finalize should be a member of something like System.FinalizableObject rather than System.Object, since in most cases where a class Foo would inherit finalizer-less Bar but hold an unmanaged resource, the proper approach is to encapsulate the resource into its own class object (which could inherit FinalizableObject) and have Foo hold a reference to that. Too late for that now, though.
Jun
3
comment Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
@EricLippert: I think the class that wants to limit inheritance could prevent such a trick by declaring a new protected virtual method named Finalize. It's too bad there's no way to declare a new sealed virtual method, since having Finalize sealed would prevent any class that tries to override it from even loading. That would require changing the classes that are supposed to forbid inheritance, though. Do you think any legitimate programs would break if the .NET class loader were changed to forbid classes which have at least one constructor but no chained calls to a parent constructor?
Jun
3
comment Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
@nawfal: Hmm... Only thing stopping me was that I forgot the distinction between interfaces and interface-type storage locations, which is ironic since I've written often about it.
Jun
3
comment What assumptions should code make about CPU memory model, and how should such assumptions be documented?
I can see your point about the potential for compiler reordering, though it would seem unfortunate if the only way to prevent such compiler optimization would be to add a memory barrier, since memory barriers can have a significant run-time cost even [especially] in cases where they're unnecessary.
Jun
3
comment C# operator overload for “+=”?
@VMAtm: As for events, someEvent += newSubscriber is equivalent to something like DelegateType oldDelegate,newDelegate; do {oldDelegate = someEvent; newDelegate = oldDelegate+newSubscriber;} while (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref someEvent, newDelegate, oldDelegate) != oldDelegate);. Quite a bit different from just someEvent = someEvent + newSubscriber;.
Jun
3
comment C# operator overload for “+=”?
@VMAtm: If Vector were a struct type (e.g. three 8-byte doubles), the statement destField = destField + src would have to create two new temporary vectors, copy destField and src to them, compute the resulting vector, and copy all the fields of that result vector to destField. If destField is a field, none of those copies could be optimized out. If the AddTo method above was written suitably, only the copy of src would be required; everything else could be done "in place".
Jun
1
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
1
comment Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
@EricLippert: Are there any cases where it should legitimately be possible to load a class which does not contain any calls to an accessible base constructor? I wonder if the CLR should be patched to prevent the loading of such classes, since at present nothing prevents a derived class from producing instances and exposing them to outside code (see my answer for an example of how that may be accomplished).
Jun
1
comment Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
I'll do you one better: the lack of CLR validation of parent calls makes it possible to construct derived-type instances and expose them to parent code. See my answer.
Jun
1
answered Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
Jun
1
comment Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?
@EricLippert: Is an open-form generic really a "class"? Certainly an open-form generic like IEnumerable<> is a Type, since the type system needs to have something to which the generic parameters can be attached, but I don't think there's any way to, e.g. cause a static class constructor to run for an unbound generic, is there?
May
31
comment Non Public Members for C# Interfaces
An interface which contained internal members, if such a thing were allowed, would be much like the aforementioned abstract class, but with the advantage that it could be implemented by classes which were derived from classes that did not.
May
31
comment Non Public Members for C# Interfaces
If one were to declares a public abstract class, all of whose members and constructors were internal, then outside code could receive from the assembly references to things of that type, and pass such references back to the assembly's methods, while maintaining type safety throughout, without the outside code having to know anything about the class in question. Unfortunately, such an approach would only work if none of the concrete derivations of the abstract class would need to inherit from anything which doesn't derive from that abstract class.
May
31
comment Just when is a stackoverflow fair and sensible?
Is there any nice way a code can detect that the available stack space is sufficiently low that it should throw an exception to avoid a stack overflow? Some types of data-structure parsing are most conveniently handled using recursive algorithms, and it would seem nicer to have the maximum allowable depth vary with the amount of available stack space than to impose a hard depth limit which, depending upon the stack available when a method is called, may or may not curtail recursion before overflowing the stack.
May
31
answered In C# what is the meaning of 1 after IEnumerable in System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1