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Jul
8
answered How can I identify a bad implementation of GetHashCode?
Jul
8
comment Optimistic vs. Pessimistic locking
The concept of optimistic locking doesn't necessarily require having a 100% reliable way of knowing whether or not something has been altered; undetectable alterations aren't acceptable, but occasional false reports of alteration may not be too bad, especially if code which receives such a report rereads the data and checks whether it has actually changed.
Jul
8
comment AtomicBoolean where is the lock?
The primary "problem" with locking code is that a thread which gets waylaid between the time it acquires lock and the time it releases it may cause the progress of other threads to be blocked indefinitely. The Atomic classes guarantee that any hardware "lock" which is acquired during the operation will be released within a very short time and nothing that might cause a thread to get waylaid can prevent that.
Jul
8
comment Locking two objects without deadlock
An int may not guarantee unique ranking. I'd suggest a long, obtained via Interlocked.Increment.
Jul
8
comment Does the using statement dispose only the first variable it create?
The pattern using (MyDisposable myDisposable = new MyDisposable(new AnotherDisposable()) {...} pattern will only be safe if the constructor for MyDisposable promises not only that MyDisposable.Dispose will dispose the object passed into the constructor, but also that if any exception occurs during the constructor itself the passed-in item will be disposed immediately--a pattern which is much harder than it should be to get right.
Jul
8
answered C# Structured List
Jul
8
comment Structs - real life examples?
I'm not sure nullable types are that great an example. They should generally be avoided in cases where speed is important, and if Nullable<T> were a reference type which simply contained a single field of type T it may in some cases be slower than a Nullable<T> structure but it wouldn't have the weird semantics that arise from the fact that an empty-valued Nullable<T> isn't a null reference but it boxes like one.
Jul
8
comment why constant size of struct despite having a vector of int
A related issue is that while arrays aren't used as much in C++ as in "old" C, it's legal to store any definable type, including vectors, in an array, and all items of an array must have the same size.
Jul
5
comment Structs - real life examples?
A two-dimensional or three-dimensional Point is a perfect example of when an exposed-field struct is appropriate (note that in C# one must explicitly declare fields public to make them so). Note that if one has two fields of a struct type Point, the fields together hold four integer values. By contrast, if two fields hold references of a mutable point class type, the fields encapsulate object identities (which might refer to the same object, or objects that happen to hold the same values). If an object isn't supposed to encapsulate identity, a struct may be better.
Jul
5
comment Structs - real life examples?
@CostaRicaDev: An exposed-field structure is semantically equivalent to the combination of fields contained therein, except that in addition to using the parts of the structure piecemeal one may also use the whole thing or pass the whole thing as a ref parameter. If what one wants is to join together a collection of independent but related values (e.g. the coordinates of a point) an exposed-field struct encapsulates that concept perfectly.
Jul
5
comment Composite key in Dictionary; override GetHashCode(), Equals etc or use structs?
Immutable classes have predictable behavior; the difficulty with them is that there's no general pattern to create an instance which is like some other instance with the exception of some specific properties. In some cases, such operations are seldom needed, but consider a PhoneNumber type with traits including AreaCode, Exchange, MainNumber. If needs to change the AreaCode of a PhoneNumber from 708 to 847, without affecting anything else how should one do it? Saying it=new PhoneNumber("847", it.AreaCode, it.MainNumber); may lose information in it.Extension.
Jul
3
comment What problem does IStructuralEquatable and IStructuralComparable solve?
...should test reference equality; base Object.ValueEquals should return True [swapping all references to two instances X and Y of type System.Object would have no observable effect on any members other than the equivalence-related GetHashCode], but entities whose states interact with other objects should override it to test reference equality.
Jul
3
comment What problem does IStructuralEquatable and IStructuralComparable solve?
It's too bad .NET didn't better define equality, and incorporate two types of Equals/GetHashCode into the Framework, with X.EquivalentTo(Y) meaning that all members of the object referred to by X would be expected to behave equivalently to all those of the object referred to by Y, and X.ValueEquals(Y) meaning that simultaneously interchanging all references to X and Y would not affect the behavior of any members of either, other than an equivalence-related hash code. Note that both definitions can be evaluated for objects of any type. Note that base Object.EquivalentTo...
Jul
3
comment terminology for what a class does with generic type parameter
@Jos.Schlitz: That might be the best terminology, though MyClass<Int32> doesn't actually exist until the binding is complete; it's the product of binding MyClass<> with type parameter Int32.
Jul
3
answered terminology for what a class does with generic type parameter
Jul
3
comment Composite key in Dictionary; override GetHashCode(), Equals etc or use structs?
I find the behavior of exposed-field structures a lot more predictable than that of classes; if one has e.g. a List<ExposedFieldStructType> and wants element 1 to be just like element 0 except for the X value, one can use var temp = myList[0]; temp.X = 3; myList[1] = temp;. That will work for all structs with an exposed int field X. With classes, however, there are many different patterns one might have to use, depending upon circumstances, to achieve that effect.
Jul
3
comment Is *a++ = *b++ = 0 safe
If a is int volatile * and b is a float volatile *, would *a++ = *b++ = 16777217; coerce the number to float, store that value to *b, then coerce that value to int, and store that in *a, without reading *b, or could it store a first (but storing a value which had been coerced to float and then int)?
Jul
3
comment Why is free() not allowed in garbage-collected languages?
@Andrey: In .NET, calling Dispose on a Wizbang may turn it into a useless Wizbang object that can no longer perform any Wizbang-specific actions, but it will remain a valid Object, and methods like GetType, Equals, etc. should continue to work. As long as any reference remains to the Wizbang, all references to it will be references to a dead Wizbang. By contrast, in a manual-allocation system, calling free on a pointer to which other copies exist may cause those other copies to become references to something entirely different.
Jul
2
comment Why can't events be invoked or their invocation list set from outside of the declaring class
Actually, the delegate is given the same name as the event--a convention which I hate (IMHO, EventName(Params) shouldn't be a direct delegate invocation--it should include the appropriate null check logic, since raising an event with no subscribers is a perfectly legitimate thing to do).
Jul
2
answered Why can't events be invoked or their invocation list set from outside of the declaring class