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Apr
23
comment Is the received stream from a socket limited to a single send command?
Length-prefix with 8-bit-transparent data is good (perhaps optimal) for protocols which involve two devices which are communicating purely via TCP. If one is communicating with an embedded device via a TCP-to-serial bridge, length-prefix is bad unless the maximum length is short enough that one can afford to send that many zeroes if the ends of a connection seem like they might be out of sync. Otherwise a delimiter-based approach with escapes or a combination of length-prefix and escapes/delimiters may be best.
Apr
23
comment When so many things can go wrong all you do is try, try, try
What would be ideal would be if the stack-unwinding code which throws the latter exception could include within it a reference to the former, but unfortunately .net doesn't provide any nice way of doing that. Since that is generally not practical, the next best thing may be to log exceptions at multiple levels, but filter out redundant logs (e.g. have the inner handlers enqueue distinct exceptions for logging, and have the outer handler write them to the log (the stack traces may have grown while the exceptions were percolating up)).
Apr
23
comment When so many things can go wrong all you do is try, try, try
Depending upon what one is doing with the exception logs, it might be useful to have exceptions logged at different points during stack unwinding, since (1) the fact that an exception was caught and supposedly handled doesn't mean it won't be of interest, and (2) if an exception occurs while unwinding the stack from a previous exception, the latter exception may be of more interest to the calling code, but whoever is examining the logs may be very interested in the former exception as well (especially since it may provide clues as to the circumstances leading up to the latter).
Apr
23
comment Possible Multiple Enumeration of IEnumerable. How to solve? Do I need to solve?
It's too bad that C# foreach and vb.net For Each weren't designed so they could accept either an enumerable object or an enumerator, since there are situations like reading items from a queue where one might logically want to use foreach with a source that can only supply items once, but such items probably shouldn't implement IEnumerable<T>.
Apr
23
revised Interface for Vector and Matrix classes?
added 1259 characters in body
Apr
23
answered Interface for Vector and Matrix classes?
Apr
23
answered Error handling practises with methods that return collections
Apr
20
comment What is the point of using GC.AddMemoryPressure with an unmanaged resource?
When the GC runs, it doesn't care how much memory pressure an object has associated with it in when it "decides" whether it's garbage. The only effect of GC pressure is to encourage the GC to run sooner than it otherwise might.
Apr
20
answered Are there any differences in the garbage collector for vb.net and c#?
Apr
20
comment Garbage collection and references C#
@AndrewBarber: One analogy which may be helpful is to think of a bowling pinsetter after the first ball is rolled. It doesn't identify and remove individual pins that have been knocked over. It picks up all the pins it can, then sweeps up EVERYTHING, and then puts the picked-up pins back.
Apr
20
comment Intercepting an exception inside IDisposable.Dispose
...if a using block was used as a transaction scope guard and something went badly wrong during an exception-triggered rollback. One wouldn't want to lose the Exception that triggered the rollback (it might provide clues as to why the rollback failed!) but one shouldn't ignore the exception that occurred in the rollback, especially since the application might have a recovery plan for the original rollback, but it would probably assume that the rollback would have succeeded. If IDisposableEx.Dispose() accepted an exception object, it could nest it within its own exception--dilemma solved.
Apr
20
comment Intercepting an exception inside IDisposable.Dispose
A language compiler can generate code which will know whether a try block completes normally (if nothing else, add code at each normal exit point to set a "completed normally" flag). It can also generate code for a filter block to determine, in case code doesn't reach the normal exit, what the exception was; the filter block might trigger for exceptions that end up disappearing during stack unwinding, but the last time it executes will be for the right exception). Passing an exception to an IDisposableEx.Dispose method would let code avoid losing an exception if disposal fails (e.g. ...
Apr
20
comment Intercepting an exception inside IDisposable.Dispose
...an derivative or variation of IDisposable that includes one (optimal would be for there to exist a variation which does not inherit IDisposable, and an interface which inherits both IDisposable and that variant. Thus classes which for proper operation required the more advanced usage could declare themselves as only implementing the variant interface, and not compile using using with old-style compilers.
Apr
20
comment Intercepting an exception inside IDisposable.Dispose
Case 3 is an oddball case which generally shouldn't happen, but it's probably good to at least know what will happen if it does. Otherwise, what will the exception pointer structure indicate in a scenario where a catch or finally block which is executing as a result of an exception calls Dispose either within a nested try block or a finally block thereof (so at the time of the Dispose the inner block can be expected to exit normally, and the outer one exit via exception)? What's really needed is for finally to receive a pending-exception parameter, and for using to support...
Apr
20
comment Why do you specify the size when using malloc in C?
@AndrewY: If you're lucky. "Back to School, Mr. Bean" offers a more realistic view. When Mr. Bean pushes a car out of a roped off parking space and uses it himself, he doesn't get a ticket. Instead, the army's scheduled demonstration of a tank's "drive over anything" abilities using the vehicle in that space proceeds as planned, using Mr. Bean's vehicle rather than the one which he had displaced.
Apr
20
answered malloc checkpoints
Apr
20
comment Is the stack garbage collected in Java?
It may also be worth noting that on some platforms (especially on embedded systems) the saved instruction pointers go into an entirely different storage area from function arguments, local variables, etc. For programs which never use indirect function calls (true of many embedded systems), this can provide substantial protection against errant code execution. Further, such a design may speed things up by avoiding the need to spend memory cycles saving or reloading the program counter on function entry/exit (a hardware stack operates directly on the program counter skipping the memory bus).
Apr
20
comment What happens to an object reference after it is set to null
@dragon66: Once you set the reference to null, it will no longer have anything to do with the object in question, and will neither know nor care what happens to it. Likewise if a reference which used to point to object1 is changed to point to object2, it will no longer know nor care what happens to object1. Why would you expect a reference to affect, or affected by, what might happen to an object which is not its target?
Apr
20
comment Intercepting an exception inside IDisposable.Dispose
...to indicate whether it was being used in a "normal" or "exceptional" context, since I don't think there's otherwise any semantically-consistent way to tell within a Dispose procedure. A big case where that construct would help would be with locking/mutex constructs. If an exception leaves a mutex-guarded resource in a bad state, attempts to use the resource shouldn't be allowed, but nor should they block (or keep blocking) forever. Instead, they should throw an exception. It would be nice if one could implement that via a using guard that could distinguish normal exit vs exception.
Apr
20
comment Intercepting an exception inside IDisposable.Dispose
Will that distinguish the cases where (1) exception is caught and handled (not rethrown) within the using statement, (2) an exception is not caught within the using statement, and the Dispose is called while unwinding the stack, or (3) exception which is not caught within the using statement, is first-pass-caught outside it, but while unwinding the stack another exception occurs which is caught and handled within the using statement, so execution after the Dispose will follow the "normal" path. I really wish using would support an IDisposable derivative which used a parameter...