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Apr
2
comment Can I set a value on a struct through reflection without boxing?
Some people like to pretend that value types derive from System.ValueType, which in turn derives from System.Object; that's only half true. An instance of a value-type object will indeed match that description, but value-type storage locations do not hold such instances. Instead, they simply hold the contents of all public and private fields that such objects would contain. A widening conversion exists from each value-type-storage-location type to its corresponding object-instance type, and narrowing reverse conversions from System.Object, interface types, or class-constrained generics.
Apr
2
comment Value type class definition in C#?
True. It would also have been helpful if there were a way to specify that particular instance methods should not be called "virtually", thus allowing myString.IsNullOrEmpty() rather than String.IsNullOrEmpty(myString). If reference types were to have such semantics, one might want to lose the struct constraint on Nullable<T>, which to be honest I never really liked anyway.
Mar
30
comment Counting the bits set in the Fibonacci number system?
Incidentally, Fibinacci coding might be useful for something like magnetic data encoding with two poulse widths, if "0" means a state transition and "1" means no transition. All such encoding schemes I've seen were table based, but it's interesting that one could use Fibonacci place values instead.
Mar
30
comment Counting the bits set in the Fibonacci number system?
The above shows a recurrence relation I'd not seen before with the Fibonacci sequence: each number is the sum of alternating preceding numbers, plus 1. If F[N] is the nth number in the sequence, and PSum[N] is the sum F[N]+F[N-2]+F[N-4]..., then if F[N] = PSum[N-1]+1, then F[N+1] = PSum[N]+1, and F[N+2] = PSum[N+1]+1 = (F[N+1]+PSum[N-1])+1 = F[N+1]+(PSum[N-1]+1) = F[N+1]+F[N]. Very elegant.
Mar
30
answered Dispose and destructor in .Net
Mar
30
comment Is there any sense in performing binary AND with a number where all bits are set to 1
@GregS: I've written code for compilers where sizeof(int)=1 and a char could hold values from -32768 to 32767 (I believe that when sizeof(int)==1, char must be signed, since an int is required to be able to hold all possible values of char). The C standard specifies that char must be at least 8 bits, and must be able to represent all characters in the standard C character set, but nothing in the C standard says it must be precisely 8 bits.
Mar
30
comment 2's complement representation of fractions?
If your number was unsigned, your bits would have values (+1/2) and (+1/4). For two's-complement format, flip the sign of the top bit, so they're (-1/2) and (+1/4). The available values are then 0, 1/4, -1/2, and -1/4.
Mar
30
answered On Undefined Behavior
Mar
30
answered 2's complement representation of fractions?
Mar
30
comment Where to close a TcpClient member
@Marcel: If your client uses Dispose properly, then the above problem can't occur, since abandoning the last surviving reference while calling some method other than Dispose would imply the client wasn't going to call Dispose. On the other hand, if the client uses Dispose properly, the finalizer will be irrelevant. While there are some occasions where one cannot reasonably expect a client to Dispose useless objects, in most cases debugging client code will be easier if Disposed objects are left hanging than if finalizers try to fix them.
Mar
30
comment Where to close a TcpClient member
@Marcel: Finalizers introduce a lot of tricky issues that are very hard to get right. Further, even when written perfectly, they will frequently turn code which would fail in a clear and obvious way into code which will work 99% of the time but may fail in bizarre and obscure ways. For example, if an object holds a resource in field r, the last thing one of the object's methods does is use that resource, and the last surviving reference to the object is abandoned immediately after calling that method, the finalizer could get triggered while that resource is still in use.
Mar
29
answered Where to close a TcpClient member
Mar
29
comment Playing Cards: Should they be enum or struct or class?
@Matthew: The idea is that if there are 52 cards, each of which is present or not present in a given set, the set of cards may be represented as a single long integer. Nice concept, and there are times it's useful; one difficulty is that there are a variety of possible encodings, which are useful for different purposes.
Mar
29
comment Multithreading and Serial Ports
My suggestion would have been to launch all the threads at startup and simply leave them running. Starting up threads is expensive. Leaving a thread continuously executing code uselessly is very expensive. Letting a thread sit blocked waiting for I/O, however, is comparatively much cheaper. Not so cheap that one should have hundreds running for no reason, but cheap enough that eight would generally be no big deal.
Mar
28
answered Multithreading and Serial Ports
Mar
28
answered Why are interfaces not able to be marked as sealed?
Mar
28
comment Why are interfaces not able to be marked as sealed?
@ShuggyCoUk: Basically, the goal would be for a module to expose an interface without having to expose everything therein or allow other modules to produce implementations thereof. I'm not sure it's worth a question since (1) I know it isn't possible to do that in type-safe fashion in vb or C#; (2) the number of people who would know what would happen if one tried to do it in CIL is pretty small; and (3) since I don't program in CIL, the question would be somewhat theoretical (i.e. is it a language restriction or a CLI/CLR restriction)?
Mar
28
comment Deconstructor, Dispose don't know what to use
In addition to calling the method Dispose, you should also implement IDisposable. If your class will be inheritable, common practice is to have an implementation of IDisposable.Dispose(void) call a protected Dispose(bool) function which does the actual disposal.
Mar
27
comment Why can an int? set to null have instance properties?
@JonHanna: I wish there had been an explicit way to declare a non-virtual method as being callable on null objects, since it would allow immutable class objects to behave as class types with usable default values (e.g. the default value of a string could behave more consistently like an empty string). Such an ability would probably also imply that Nullable<T> shouldn't have a struct constraint on T, but since I consider that constraint a mistake anyhow, that would have been no loss.
Mar
27
comment Why are interfaces not able to be marked as sealed?
@ShuggyCoUk: If an interface is defined as internal, is there any way type-safe way to pass instances to external code and have them pass them back? Consider the scenario, class UsCheckingAccount, derived from UsBankAccount, and FrenchCheckingAccount, derived from FrenchBankAccount, are in an assembly. I'd like to define an ICheckingAccount which could be either of them, but have code which accepts an ICheckingAccount know that it's actually one of those, rather than some other arbitrary class. (Yes, I know, class inheritance is not real security).