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Dec
16
comment Am I writing this exception handling cleanly?
@Chuck Blumreich: If the caller of the CVSData constructor might want to recover from recoverable errors, without risking muddling on after unrecoverable ones, it must be able to distinguish between failures in which the only things that might have been corrupted were newly-created objects which have been jettisoned, and those in which other aspects of the system state were corrupted. Your class might not be certain what an ArgumentException from CvReader.ToDataTable() means, but if you let it leak your caller will have no idea what an ArgumentException from you means.
Dec
16
answered Generating binary numbers with length n with same amount of 1's and 0's
Dec
16
comment Difference between C# and VB.NET for default values of private members
The vb.net approach allows field initializers to make reference to the object under construction.
Dec
16
answered ARM cortex: mutex using bit banding
Dec
16
answered Why can't I declare bitfields as automatic variables?
Dec
16
comment Does throwing exception at the end of constructor damage the object?
Passing an instance out of a protected constructor (making it available to a factory method) can be a very good idea, if the object in question implements IDisposable. A factory method which wraps the constructor can then call Dispose on the partially-constructed object. The Dispose routine will have to be written to handle this possibility, of course, but for derived classes, the pattern seems cleaner than putting 'try' blocks in every constructor.
Dec
16
comment Uniform handling of many exceptions
...is pending; unfortunately, support for that is provided in neither the language nor in the CLR even though both should be able to provide it. If a 'finally' block is unable to perform its cleanup following an exception in the 'try' block, both exceptions should get logged; the only good way for that to happen is for the 'finally' block to know what exception (if any) is pending when it starts.
Dec
16
comment Uniform handling of many exceptions
@liortal: VB supports exception filters directly, while C# provides no means of accessing them (except by wrapping delegates in a DLL produced in a language which does). The above syntax is a perfectly legitimate way of using one 'catch' to handle two types of exception in vb; an alternative form could be Catch Ex As Exception When ExceptionIsNotReallyEvil(Ex), where ExceptionIsNotReallyEvil can examine an exception (and possibly InnerException) and determine whether to catch an exception. I haven't figured out what the cleanest way is of letting the Finally block know if an exception...
Dec
16
revised Dealing with exceptions in constructor when implementing IDisposable
Added footnote
Dec
16
answered Dealing with exceptions in constructor when implementing IDisposable
Dec
15
comment Uniform handling of many exceptions
@liortal: It'd be 1000x better if C# simply supported exception filters and/or provided a means by which code in the "Finally" block could know what was going on. I'd consider something like Catch Ex As Exception When TypeOf(Ex) Is ThisException OrElse TypeOf(Ex) Is ThatException to be clearer than any similar construct available in C#. Code which uses filters for logging is less clear, even in vb, but can log some things that really can't be logged as well without using filters.
Dec
15
comment How can i use the Garbage Collector?
@Jon Harrop: I recognize that there is value in handling large objects differently from small ones. What I don't understand are the reasons behind having large objects start in Gen2, having them allocated with granularity smaller than 4k, having 8KB arrays of Double stored in the LOH, etc. Even if one didn't bother actually reclaiming space from LOH objects until Gen2, I see no reason they shouldn't start out in Gen0 so as to avoid unnecessary promotion of objects to which they hold references.
Dec
15
comment Immutable Data Structures in C#
@JaredPar: As noted, struct methods receive "this" by reference; this is semantically significant if a struct uses "this" after calling outside code. The same behavior would occur with classes if void instanceMethod()... were replaced by static void theType.staticMethod(ref it)... and the invocation was changed from someInstance.instanceMethod(); to staticMethod(ref someInstance);.
Dec
15
comment How do I find out if a class is immutable in C#?
I don't see the ambiguity. A collection of type T holds things of type T as values. If I have a list of ten red Toyotas (or more precisely, a list of ten Vehicle Identification Numbers which happen to refer to red Toyotas), and I lock that list in a vault, there's no reason I should expect that action to prevent someone from painting the cars green (meaning the list would now have ten green cars). Locking the list in a vault would, however, prevent anyone from turning it into a list of ten Fords (since the manufacturer of a car is an immutable property).
Dec
15
comment Immutable Data Structures in C#
...the method would see the change if Coordinate was a struct (since "this" is passed by reference), but not if it's a class (since "this" is passed by value).
Dec
15
comment Immutable Data Structures in C#
...(3) the "this" parameter for structures is passed by reference rather than by value. Suppose a routine takes two 'ref' parameters, p1 and p2, of type Coordinate, and sets p1 to a new Coordinate. Regardless of whether Coordinate is a class or struct, the change will affect p2 only if the same variable or field was passed to both p1 and p2. On the other hand, suppose Coordinate had a method which would take a delegate and call that delegate before returning _x. If the call to delegate modifies the field or variable upon which that method was called...
Dec
15
comment Immutable Data Structures in C#
@JaredPar: The fields of Coordinate are private. How would anyone get a reference to them? Structures with exposed fields have useful mutable-value semantics; they don't really fit the "everything is an Object" model of .net--not because they're evil, but because of limitations in .net's model. Immutable structures behave like immutable reference types except that (1) the default value of a structure type is a structure in which all fields have default values, whereas the default for a class type is "null"; (2) structures are never ReferenceEquals; and...
Dec
15
answered Immutable Data Structures in C#
Dec
15
comment Immutable Data Structures in C#
...could benefit from the other's calling convention. For example, an immutable class type could behave as a mutable value type if properties could replace "this". For example, if one has a string and one wants a string which identical except that the fifth character is replaced with 'E', one could do that if an indexed property could take "this" by reference. MyString[5]='E'; would replace MyString with a new string whose fifth character was 'E'.
Dec
15
comment Immutable Data Structures in C#
@JaredPar: If Coordinate was a class, a caller that passed in a variable "foo" of type Coordinate would see foo.X and foo.Y change, just as with a struct (foo would no longer point to the same instance). The place where the semantics of immutable classes and "immutable" structs differ is with "this". Structure methods are passed "this" by reference, while class methods are passed "this" by value. I wish it were possible to mark struct or non-virtual class methods to indicate whether they should take "this" by reference or value, since there are situations where each...