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May
6
comment What exception to throw on invalid object state?
@MatthewWatson: In many cases, the very fact that a method call exits via exception implies that something, somewhere, is not in the state that would be expected if the call had returned normally. The $50,000 question is what is in an unexpected state. In many cases, the proper course of action is to jettison corrupt objects, crashing if and only if the program can't continue without them. If a program-logic problem occurs while loading a document from a file, for example, the corruption is limited to the partially-constructed document, and code can get by without that document, ...
May
6
comment What exception to throw on invalid object state?
@MatthewWatson: The ProgramLogicException exception concept may be reasonable, though not wonderfully so, since it provides no clue as to what a caller should do. Sorry I misremembered the exception thrown in the particular case of Dictionary.Add, though I recall there are other places in the framework where IOE indicates that the object can't perform the precise requested operation, but is (typically) in a state where it might perform some others, and the caller might have an idea as to why the operation failed.
May
6
comment What exception to throw on invalid object state?
@MatthewWatson: Exception handling is by its nature an icky business; the pattern of using the type of a thrown exception as a means of deciding who should catch it may have justifiable in the design of a language like C++ which has no "special" class types hard-coded into the language, but it has limitations which Java and .NET have failed to address. Although ObjectDisposedException may not accurately describe what caused a failure, it is more accurate than any other exception I can think of in describing the state of the object afterward.
May
6
comment What exception to throw on invalid object state?
@MatthewWatson: Thus my recommendation that a custom exception may be better. I take the view that exception handling is (or should be) concerned less with the particulars of what happened than with the resulting system state. Code which gets an InvalidOperationException when adding something to a dictionary-ish collection may expect that when the exception is caught, the collection will contain an item with the given key. If that isn't true, the method shouldn't throw that exception. Operations which fail with objects in unexpected states should cause unexpected exceptions.
May
6
comment Best exception for an invalid generic type argument
...I would think the argument in favor of a Framework exception here is more compelling than for a custom exception. The general nature of NSE is that when a reference to an object as a general type, and some but not all of the specific types of object to which the reference points will support an ability, attempting to use the ability on a specific type which doesn't support it should throw NSE. I would consider a Foo<T> to be a "general type", and Foo<Bar> to be a "specific type" in that context, even though there's no "inheritance" relation between them.
May
6
comment Best exception for an invalid generic type argument
Adding exceptions to the Framework may have a high "burden of proof", but defining custom exceptions shouldn't. Things like InvalidOperationException are icky, because "Foo asks collection Bar to add something that already exists, so Bar throws IOE" and "Foo asks collection Bar to add something, so Bar calls Boz which throws IOE even though Bar isn't expecting it to" will both throw the same exception type; code which is expecting to catch the first won't be expecting the latter. That having been said...
May
6
comment What exception to throw on invalid object state?
A better example for the overall principle might be trying to Add an item to a dictionary-ish object in which an internal linked list has become corrupted (e.g. due to illegitimate multi-threaded use). Normally, an InvalidOperatonException thrown from an Add method would indicate that an item with the indicated key had already been added, and code which catches such an exception would likely expect that to be true. I would posit that it's very bad to throw an exception of a type that has associated expectations when the state of an object doesn't fit them.
May
6
comment Why do you not explicitly call finalize() or start the garbage collector?
I'd consider the usage case for WeakReference much stronger than the one for SoftReference. If Foo needs a reference to Bar for Foo's benefit, it should use a strong reference. If Foo needs a reference to Bar for Bar's benefit, it should use a weak reference. For example, Bar may want to be notified each time Foo does something, but Foo would be just as happy if it didn't have to notify anyone. If the only references to Bar are held by things that don't really care if it exists, then it shouldn't exist.
May
6
comment How can Dispose() know it was called because of an exception?
@vidstige: ...should be neither holding the lock forever, nor releasing the lock and letting other code reacquire it; the right behavior in many cases should be to invalidate the lock so all present and future attempts to acquire it will fail with an immediate exception. Such behavior would guard against corruption just as effectively as would leaving the lock held forever, but would make it easier for code that would be able to recover from that situation to do so.
May
6
comment How can Dispose() know it was called because of an exception?
@vidstige: Another thing to consider is that data access layers may not support rollbacks in all situations, and using blocks may guard resources that don't have no concept of a rollback. The using statement works nicely with lock tokens (creating an object acquires a lock, and Dispose releases the lock), but it would be enhanced substantially if one could say using (var token = myLock.EnterDangerBlock()), and have the Dispose method invalidate myLock if the using block exits via exception. Note that in many cases, the proper behavior if code exits a lock unexpectedly...
May
6
comment Writing our own Dispose method instead of using Idisposable
I would say that a fundamental parts of the .NET object contract, which objects should attempt to obey to the fullest extent possible, is that object cleanup prior to abandonment should not require any action other than calling IDisposable.Dispose [for classes which don't implement IDisposable, no action should be required]. Even though IDisposable is an interface, it should be thought of more as part of the Object contract, especially since the fact that a concrete class didn't implement IDisposable would more about the class than the fact that it did.
May
6
answered What exception to throw on invalid object state?
May
6
comment What exception to throw on invalid object state?
@MatthewWatson: I think the problem with InvalidOperationException may be illustrated by example: suppose the Add method for a non-threadsafe Dictionary-ish type finds a cycle in a linked list of nodes associated with a hash value. Code which calls foo.Add(bar) and catches InvalidOperationException would likely expect that foo is an internally-consistent structure to which bar has already been added, when in reality it may be a broken data structure to which bar was never added.
May
6
answered Is there a constraint that restricts my generic method to numeric types?
May
3
comment call stack: catch vs. throws
By contrast, if one of the things that that got corrupted is critically needed for the program to keep working, then the fact that it was invalidated will bring things to a crashing halt. If code consistently followed the pattern that anything which might be corrupted by an unexpected exception would be expressly invalidated before the exception made its way up the call stack, then Pokemon exception handling would be safe. Unfortunately, the pattern isn't widely followed and thus there's often no sensible way to handle unexpected exceptions.
May
3
comment call stack: catch vs. throws
The biggest failings in the exception-handling frameworks I'm familiar with (mainly Java and .net) are the presumptions that code that wants to act on an exception will expect to resolve it, and worse, that the type of an exception should generally suffice to answer both questions. I would posit that in many cases, the proper pattern would be for code that gets an unexpected exception while working some data structures to expressly invalidate anything that might be corrupted. If none of the things that might have been corrupted are ever needed, code goes back to running happily.
May
3
comment call stack: catch vs. throws
...one could specify concisely that method calls were not expected to throw any checked exceptions other than those explicitly caught, and any checked exceptions thrown thereby should be wrapped and rethrown as some other exception type. Note that the fact that a method throws SomeCheckedException itself does not mean that a SomeCheckedException thrown in a nested call should be considered "expected" and propagate up. If the code that calls the method isn't expecting the exception, it should get wrapped in an unchecked exception type.
May
3
comment call stack: catch vs. throws
Your dislike for letting persistence exceptions propagate to higher layers isn't unique. Unless an API documents every exception the caller should expect to handle, callers may be forced to use Pokemon exception handling. The idea that routines' declarations should specify exceptions they expect to throw is actually a good one; the weakness in Java's implementation is the apparent assumption that if any caller will want to handle a condition, all callers will want to handle it. Checked exceptions would be a good thing if...
May
3
comment Why explicit interface implementation?
Inheritable classes which implement interfaces should either do so with virtual public members (in those cases where the members should be accessible as class members) or with virtual protected members whose name is a modified form of the interface member name or signature. VB.NET allows the latter to be done directly Protected Overridable Sub Foo_Impl() Implements IInterface.Foo but in C# the best one can do is define a protected virtual method to hold the "guts" of the interface, and have the interface implementation do nothing but chain to that.
May
3
comment c# System.Threading.Timer wait for dispose
Things like timers are very hard for the GC to handle. The problem is that if e.g. a timer event serves only to do something to some object "George" every second, the timer will be useful as long as anyone is interested in George, and will cease to be useful once all references to George by potentially-interested entities are abandoned. One may be able to handle the situation by having a timer hold a WeakReference to George, and dispose itself if the weak reference dies; such an approach may use the GC, but is hardly "leaving the job to the GC".