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Mar
21
answered CLR managed threads: lightweight vs heavy process
Mar
21
comment Why does the IEEE 754 standard use a 127 bias?
Allowing two numbers to exist whose difference is too small to represent is a problem which some implementations choose to ignore. Did VAX format solve the problem or ignore it? My thought would be that the problem shouldn't be ignored, but subnormals aren't the best solution. For cases where multiplications or divisions would resolve to zero, I'd like to see an positive and negative "infinitessimal" values, whereas adds or subtracts yielding zero should yield unsigned zero. Never going to happen, but it would get rid of some of the asymmetries surrounding zeroes.
Mar
21
comment is if(float > int) really if(float > (float)int)?
It's worth noting that while 1000000001 > (float)1000000000 wo;; return false, that's because the latter quantity doesn't really represent "1,000,000,000". Instead, it represents "something between 999,999,968 and 1,000,000,032"; the former quantity is not definitively larger than the latter. Note that 1222333443 will compare equal to 1222333444f, but 1222333443.0 will compare greater than 1222333444f, since the latter will get coerced into 1222333440.0 (conversions between float and double regard conversion from less specific to more specific as "widening"--the opposite of other types).
Mar
21
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
20
comment Float and double in c#
Why is float to double conversion considered widening, while double to float isn't? Logically, the reverse should be true, since e.g. (float)((double)0.1) and (float)((double)1E38*10.0) will yield (float)0.1 and (float)+INF [meaning something greater than 3.4E38], both of which are correct. By contrast, (double)(0.1f) or (double)((float)1E38f*10.0f) will yield (double)0.10000000149011612 and (double)+INF [meaning something greater than 1.79E308], both of which are wrong. Casts from more specific classes to less specific are widening, while reverse casts are narrowing. Why are floats backward?
Mar
20
comment Why does the IEEE 754 standard use a 127 bias?
I wonder how the hardware efficiency of handling denormals compares with the hardware efficiency of having the next larger number after 1.00B-127 be 1.00B-126, then 1.10B-126, then 1.00B-125, 1.01B-125, etc. In other words, round off every number to the nearest 1.00B-127. That would avoid the weird underflow behavior one would normally get without denormals, even though it wouldn't provide the benefit of their extra range. I would guess the range isn't nearly as important as ensuring that (a-b) is zero only if (a==b), so if the rounding was cheaper than denormals, it could be a win.
Mar
20
comment Learning Exception Handling Patterns
To be sure, one problem with such parameters is that there isn't necessarily any consistent way of handling them; perhaps an enumerated type would be better than Boolean, or else a delegate or interface function which would indicate what should be done (a delegate or interface could provide be useful for operations should should e.g. be retried periodically unless or until an operator clicks "cancel").
Mar
20
comment Learning Exception Handling Patterns
Interesting links. Mr. Cwalina doesn't seem to like having public methods which either throw or tolerate errors based upon a parameter, but such an approach if used consistently would seem the best way to deal with nested triers/doers. If TryOrGetByte has a ThrowOnError parameter, one can write TryOrGetPacket with a similar parameter which it passes to TryOrGetByte. Methods GetPacket and TryGetPacket can then simply call TryOrGetByte with appropriate ThrowOnError values. If TryGetByte and GetByte are separate methods, one must duplciate code in GetPacket/TryGetPacket.
Mar
19
answered Have implemented IEquatable correctly? Should I always override GetHashCode?
Mar
19
comment Why doesn't ICollection<T> implement ICollection?
The semantics of ICollection.CopyTo() are that it will accept any type of array, and throw an exception if any item in the collection is not of a type suitable for the particular array passed in. The concepts of covariance, contravariance, and invariance are only meaningful in the context of some particular type parameter. Since ICollection.CopyTo has none, there should be no particular problem.
Mar
19
comment Why doesn't ICollection<T> implement ICollection?
ICollection is essentially IEnumerable plus Count(). If ICollection<T> inherited ICollection, a routine that was expecting an IEnumerable<Animal> but was given an IList<Cat> could easily determine the number of items therein by trying to cast to ICollection. Note that a cast to IList<Animal> would fail, and the routine would have to use awkward and ugly Reflection to discover that a cast to IList<Animal> would be possible.
Mar
19
answered Why events does not support binding inherited types?
Mar
19
answered Covariant instance types on open instance delegates
Mar
19
comment Using Delegates in C# Asynchronously
What's the proper pattern if code decides that it isn't going to care about what happens with an asynchronous task (e.g. because a user clicked "cancel"), but a "cancel" request isn't immediately responsive? Simply arrange to have its callback call EndInvoke and die, and then abandon it (figuring the callback will be kept alive until the task finishes or processes the cancel request, whereupon the callback will execute and clean up the IAsyncResult?
Mar
19
comment Restricting a generic type parameters to have a specific constructor
@amandatarafa: My point was that it would be nice if one could use the former syntax rather than the latter. To properly expose properties in all cases (e.g. when many appear as ref parameters in the same function call) would require some kind of variadic generic or immutable-collection-of-ref type which does not yet exist, but I would think that allowing collection to expose items by ref and know when modifications are complete would be far nicer than having to use class objects with callbacks.
Mar
19
answered Mentioning of ref in C# function parameters
Mar
19
comment How to unsubscribe an anonymous function in Dispose method of a class?
@Relativity: Even though dangling subscriptions are harmless in such cases, they're still icky. It really peeves me that neither vb.net nor C# provides a convenient means of unsubscribing all the events to which one is attached.
Mar
19
comment How to unsubscribe an anonymous function in Dispose method of a class?
@Relativity: If object X subscribes to any events from object Y but does not unsubscribe, the dangling events will cause object X to stay in memory at least as long as object Y. If the memory lifetime of object Y will be much longer than the useful lifetime of object X, this can be a bad thing. If during the memory lifetime of object Y, many instances of object X will be created and abandoned, it can be very bad if not disastrous. If, however, Y will be eligible for collection when time X becomes useless, the dangling subscription will not keep X alive.
Mar
19
comment Why can't I access the class internals of List<T> when I derive from it?
I can think of at least two things: (1) Pass a list item as a ref parameter to outside code or methods like Interlocked.CompareExchange; (2) For types inheriting List<someValueType>, access items' individual fields (including modifying them or passing them as ref parameters).
Mar
19
answered Why derive a List<T> class just to restate an indexer?