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Jan
12
comment Synchronized IEnumerator<T>
I don't particularly like having the EnumerateInLock method pass an IEnumerable<T> to the called routine, since there's no guarantee that it won't be persisted outside the proper scope. I would think it cleaner to have the EnumerateInLock routine call a passed-in delegate with each item in the collection, and then return the number of items processed. Such a routine could specify what semantics such an enumeration is supposed to have if the collection is changed, and if items are passed using a ref parameter, it could even allow a means for updating the collection.
Jan
12
comment For Microsoft built classes that inherit IDisposable, do I explicitly have to call Dispose?
...code which calls new parentClass() won't unexpectedly receive an IDisposable, and thus won't have to worry about cleaning it up, code which calls new disposableChildClass() will receive an IDisposable and thus know it does have to clean it up, and code which uses a passed-in instance of baseClass can expect that the calling code will clean up that instance, so it doesn't have to. Note that factory methods should not return IDisposable objects unless the declared return type is an IDisposable class, since callers of the factory will not be expecting to do cleanup.
Jan
12
comment For Microsoft built classes that inherit IDisposable, do I explicitly have to call Dispose?
I would word it as: "The implementation of IDisposable indicates that a type might hold unmanaged resources, so whoever calls their constructor should ensure that Dispose will get called; in the absence of any specific contract to the contrary, the stronger implication is that classes which don't implement IDisposable don't hold unmanaged resources and do not impose cleanup responsibilities upon their creator. Note that it is acceptable for a class to implement IDisposable even if its parent does not, without violating the Liskov Substitutability Principle, because...
Jan
12
comment For Microsoft built classes that inherit IDisposable, do I explicitly have to call Dispose?
Although I consider the bool parameter of Dispose(bool) to be a dummy parameter, the pattern of having a non-virtual method implement an interface by calling a protected virtual method is a good one since it allows a consistent pattern for derived classes to add dispose logic independent of whether their parent implements IDisposable implicitly or explicitly. I dislike the non-virtual function as implemented by Microsoft, however; IMHO, it should use an integer flag with Interlocked.Exchange, to provide thread-safe protection against redundant disposal.
Jan
12
answered Suggestions on how to avoid disposing of an object twice
Jan
11
comment Reference types - can we see the actual reference?
...that would seem like it could greatly improve efficiency when accessing small objects. Since I would guess that probably half of the object instances in a typical running program will be 16 bytes or less, if not 8, eliminating an extra memory fetch for each object access would seem like a big win. Any idea if any new CPU's might support such a thing?
Jan
11
comment Reference types - can we see the actual reference?
Out of curiosity, while existing CPU's probably wouldn't allow such things to be very efficient, I wonder whether it would be worthwhile in future CPUs to have a small-object heap for objects whose data is 8 (maybe 16) bytes or less, where each slot in object table would hold the actual object data instead of a pointer to it. On existing CPUs, one would need extra instructions for each heap access to determine which heap any given reference belonged to, but if there were a "get object address" instruction which used a bit in the reference to select single or double indirection...
Jan
11
comment Reference types - can we see the actual reference?
I think it's important to note that while existing .net implementations may store addresses (of object-info records) in reference variables, there is no guarantee that future versions will do so. It would be possible, for example, that some bits of a reference variable would be an index selecting one of a number of heaps, while other bits were an index within that heap. While such a system might be inefficient with existing processors, designing future processors around such a model might allow more efficient cache utilization. Existing .net code shouldn't care about such details.
Jan
11
comment Simulating multiple instances of an embedded processor
@LasseV.Karlsen: I added some more explicit questions. Sorry if I'm asking too many questions in a single SO question page, but I don't really know which of the questions would be most usefully answered; if there's a good way to e.g. solve my problem using appdomains, that would reduce my need to know how to e.g. create multiple copies of a DLL from the same source files in the same VS2010 instance.
Jan
11
revised Simulating multiple instances of an embedded processor
added 3326 characters in body
Jan
11
comment Is it a breaking change that modifying the access modifier of a public property?
@JeffreySax: One cannot just mark two independent methods and have languages regard them as a property getter and setter. There must also be a defined "Property" which links the named property with the getter and setter method; a similar concept exists (equally uselessly, IMHO) for events.
Jan
11
answered When to use parallel counting - MIT HAKMEM for bitcount when memory is an issue?
Jan
10
comment Is it a breaking change that modifying the access modifier of a public property?
I really hate the way properties are implemented in .net; I what real advantage there is to having three types of properties, one of which includes two methods, rather than simply having property getters and setters be methods with some attribute that indicates that, for purposes of syntax, debugging display, serialization, etc. they should be regarded as properties? If it were possible for a routine to accept a parameter of type Property<int>, I could see some real benefit to having the getter and setter bound together as a single entity, but it isn't. So what's the benefit?
Jan
10
comment Simulating multiple instances of an embedded processor
Is there any nice way to run 16 copies of the main application code and be able to use the debugger with them? The only approach I've been able to figure would be to make each application instance be an instance of a C++ class, but that seems a bit icky.
Jan
10
revised Simulating multiple instances of an embedded processor
edited tags
Jan
10
asked Simulating multiple instances of an embedded processor
Jan
9
comment How to catch the original (inner) exception in C#?
@IanBoyd: If the use of a provider-agnostic wrapper is necessitated by the existence of four application layers (your database-specific code calls some database-agnostic business logic, which calls the wrapper, which calls the actual database-specific interface routines), then passing an exception-wrapping or error-handling delegate to the wrapper can be a good approach. If you can't control the code in business-logic layer but do control the database-specific wrapper, you might be able to pass the delegate as a threadstatic variable. Somewhat icky, but potentially useful.
Jan
9
comment How to catch the original (inner) exception in C#?
@Ian Boyd: Something is turning the SqlException into a DbException. The code that's doing that should be examining the SqlException object and report the details of what happened, in a provider-agnostic fashion, in DbException. Since code which relies upon the details of an SqlException isn't going to be provider-agnostic, much of the benefit one would get from using a provider-agnostic wrapper is lost and one the code may as well simply use SqlClient directly without the use of a wrapper class.
Jan
9
answered How to catch the original (inner) exception in C#?
Jan
9
answered Will disposable object clone cause memory leak in C#?