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Dec
10
comment Algorithm for calculating time durations in tempo changing music?
There are some ways of implementing a logarithmic tempo change, but the first step I'd suggest is to start by deriving things in terms of counts per beat as indicated above. If one wants to do a logarithmic change, one can compute Math.Pow(newTempo/oldTempo, 1.0/numSteps) and then multiply the tempo by the result of that function on numSteps beats, after which one should set the tempo to precisely newTempo.
Dec
9
answered Algorithm for calculating time durations in tempo changing music?
Dec
9
answered Why does MSDN recommend including object sender in delegate declarations?
Dec
9
comment What types other than IEEE-754 floating-point types define relational operators non-transitively or equality non-reflexively
The 80-bit floats worked very nicely when using a compiler that supported them properly (as Borland's compilers tended to do from my experience). IMHO, 99% of the ire against those types is a result of compilers which failed to provide a user-accessible type that could hold intermediate results, or would arbitrarily round values when spilling FPU registers. Such semantics are terrible, but I don't blame the 80-bit format. Further, there can IMHO be some semantic advantages to a language including a "universal" numeric primitive to which all others can be losslessly converted.
Dec
9
comment What types other than IEEE-754 floating-point types define relational operators non-transitively or equality non-reflexively
Since then, after Java and Microsoft both decided to favor lower-precision semantics, hardware vendors have pushed to deprecate the more precise maths.
Dec
9
comment What types other than IEEE-754 floating-point types define relational operators non-transitively or equality non-reflexively
Few languages include a compiler intrinsic to perform such reinterpretation, and use of such an approach (especially in compilers without an intrinsic) would make it difficult for a compiler to use an instruction for such a test if hardware happened to add one. A compiler-intrinsic ordering operation could be implemented by the compiler to use bit-hackery when required, but use hardware when available. Further, languages influence hardware design; in the 1980s and early 1990s when Borland compilers used Kahan's recommended numerical evaluation approach, hardware was optimized for that.
Dec
9
comment What types other than IEEE-754 floating-point types define relational operators non-transitively or equality non-reflexively
I wonder why languages don't nicely support any intrinsic ordering relations? Sorting arrays of numbers would seem like an operation which is both common and likely to be performance-critical, so having to jump through hoops to get a ranking would seem inefficient.
Dec
9
comment What types other than IEEE-754 floating-point types define relational operators non-transitively or equality non-reflexively
IEEE-754 requires that languages provide some form of relational operators which behave a certain way. I am unaware of it saying that the language cannot provide additional operators. Nor am I aware of anything that would mandate that any particular symbols be used for particular operators. Correct me if I'm wring, but I am unaware of anything in IEEE-754 which would preclude a language using the character sequence X.IEEE_LT.Y to test the IEEE-754 less-than relation, and X.LT.Y to test a ranking relation; the only requirement I know of is that the first operator must exist.
Dec
9
comment Is rounding behavior of string-to-double methods defined?
Certainly hex float format has a lot of advantages, but there is something to be said for having "human-readable" numbers that are also machine readable. Decimal format is bulkier, but it should still capable of uniquely representing a given double value if the behavior of the parsing method is specified.
Dec
8
comment When to use Weak and Phantom references in Java
The probability of a finalizable object getting resurrected isn't "slim"--it's 100%; a finalizable object which would cease to exist but for the existence of a finalize method will have a strong reference to it placed on the stack when its finalizer starts running. The object can't be deleted until that reference (and all other rooted reference) have ceased to exist.
Dec
8
comment Which one to use - memmove() or memcpy() - when buffers don't overlap?
@StephenCanon: If one has e.g. a 32-bit-aligned pointer to a sequence of structures holding four uint16_t values each, would one have to cast the address to uint32_t* and then to unsigned char* to avoid aliasing issues?
Dec
8
comment Which one to use - memmove() or memcpy() - when buffers don't overlap?
@StephenCanon: For cases where the programmer knows that a pointer will always be word-aligned but the compiler can't know that, there's no way a legitimate memcpy() implementation could omit the code necessary to determine alignment. On the ARM7-TDMI, a 16-byte aligned copy would be two instructions totaling 12 cycles; no legitimate memcpy() could come close.
Dec
6
comment Is it guaranteed to be safe to perform memcpy(0,0,0)?
@tmyklebu: Given char *p = 0; int i=something;, evaluation of the expression (p+i) will yield Undefined Behavior even when i is zero.
Dec
6
comment How to use and when is good use memmove in C?
@SethCarnegie: If an implementation guarantees that an expression like (p>q) will never do anything other than yielding 1 or 0, even if p and q point to unrelated memory areas, then it could implement memmove() to require only one extra if. Given char *p=malloc(16), q[16]; the expression (p>q) could do anything (i.e. Undefined Behavior). Even though, for any valid source and destination pointers, either an ascending loop would work or a descending loop would work, there's no portable way to determine which one would be safe.
Dec
6
comment Which one to use - memmove() or memcpy() - when buffers don't overlap?
...inefficient than a simple uint32-copying loop when copying just a few words of data when the programmer--but not the compiler--knows such a loop would work. Implementations of memcpy() are often optimized for the aligned-to-aligned scenario, but the time required to test for alignment might exceed the time required to actually copy a few words of data.
Dec
6
comment Which one to use - memmove() or memcpy() - when buffers don't overlap?
@StephenCanon: I wonder if there would be any problem with a future C standard picking some never-before-used identifier and saying that any program which defines a function with the name __uint32_copy_xy193qrq91 [or other similar names for other types] must implement it to have some particular semantics, and then defining that as the name for a new standard method to copy aligned int32 data. Doing that would make it possible to write code which would work correctly on old compilers, but could achieve faster performance than memcpy on newer compilers [memcpy() will often be...
Dec
6
comment Is it guaranteed to be safe to perform memcpy(0,0,0)?
@tmyklebu: It would be reasonable on some platforms to implement memcpy as something like char *end=src+count;while(src<end){*dest++=*src++;} [saving the need to modify count during the loop]. Passing an invalid src pointer would trigger UB even if count is zero.
Dec
5
comment How to “safely publish” lazily-generated effectively-immutable array
@Holger: I think I finally understand at least one realistic problem: the JIT has no way of knowing whether a store and reload from a final variable on the same thread was intended to enforce an ordering or not, and there are enough situations where a temporary object with a final field is never exposed that it is in general worthwhile for the JITter to eliminate such writes and any orderings they would imply. Do you know if Java has any native methods which would force the JITter to consider a reference "exposed" but which would have no other effect?
Dec
5
answered Why do struct arrays not require a membership operator?
Dec
4
comment WeakReference too weak?
The objects identified by the weak references would be collectible, but the event wrappers and weak references would all be strongly referenced by the event publisher. If the event fires, all of those event wrappers will get unsubscribed, but unless or until that happens an unbounded number of them may get created and added to the event list.