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Aug
25
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
@Muzer: I meant checksum to be uint16_t, but I typoed, making behavior Implementation-defined in machines with 16 bits rather than fully defined, but it's still better than the situation with 32-bit ints, where it would invoke Undefined Behavior if the product of dat and n exceeds 2147483647.
Aug
24
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
@Muzer: Further, the way the Standard is defined makes it excessively difficult for embedded code to avoid UB when being ported from one platform to another. For example, given int16_t checksum; void updateChecksumMulti(uint16_t dat, uint16_t n) { checksum += dat*n; } will never yield Undefined Behavior if run on an 8-bit or 16-bit machine, but may yield Undefined Behavior on a 32-bit machine. Wile writing the expression as 1u*dat*n; would work, and hopefully an embedded compiler would be smart enough not to actually do the multiply, I'd suggest that makes the code less clear.
Aug
24
comment Is the behaviour of the compiler undefined, with Undefined Behaviour?
If a program contains any #pragma directives, it would be legitimate, from the point of view of the Standard, for the mere act of compiling it to invoke nasal demons.
Aug
24
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
@Muzer: The decision of whether to leave something undefined or implementation-defined seems to have been predicated upon whether on some platforms or for some kinds of applications it might be useful to have the compiler generate code that would trap or raise a signal in a fashion outside the Standard's jurisdiction. From a requirements perspective, there's no semantic difference between "Division by zero may yield an indeterminate value or cause a trap whose behavior an implementation should, but need not, document" versus simply saying it yields "Undefined Behavior".
Aug
24
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
...from specifying that (int16_t)32768 will normally yield -32768, but will yield 24601 if the program is launched with the of command-line argument of "EASTEREGG" and the value was not used in a place where the Standard required a constant expression.
Aug
24
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
@Muzer: Things like INT_MAX make it possible for programs to accommodate a range of platforms, but it's not generally possible without extreme awkwardness to write code which will run correctly on every possible standard-conforming compiler where it compiles, since most programs will rely upon behaviors for which no standard testing macros exist. For example, a lot of code assumes that given int16_t x; the expression (int16_t)(uint16_t)x will always equal x, and while that may be true of all production C compilers, I don't think anything in the Standard would forbid a compiler...
Aug
24
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
23
comment Restricted pointer questions
@einpoklum: Some processors use special instructions (often with its own dedicated address space) for the purpose of I/O, and do not have anything other than memory in any part of the address space that pointers can reach. On such instructions, I/O is typically implemented either via compiler intrinsic or by linking to code written in another language. Most 8031 variants, for example, have a 128-byte address space for I/O which can only be accessed via direct-mode instructions; there are no instructions that would allow code to write to an I/O register identified by a pointer.
Aug
23
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
...would be equally happy with it yielding any value congruent to the mathematical integer value of x+y mod 4294967296, I would posit that the most natural and readable way to express that when compiling for hardware platform that can implement such semantics (are there any modern ones that can't?) would be to write it as x+y. Having overflow return partially-indeterinate values will facilitate optimizations which will be unavailable if the programmer has to write code that avoids overflows at all costs.
Aug
23
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
...the world in which today's programs run is very different environment. If the authors of C standards wish the language to remain useful, they should acknowledge these realities and define some normative standards for behavior so that programs whose two requirements are: (1) Generate correct output given valid input; (2) Generate arbitrary output, within broad constraints, when given invalid input, don't have to write extra code to constrain the compiler more tightly than they want or need to. If a programmer wants to compute x+y when it's representable as int, and...
Aug
23
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
...may not want anyway. C was designed for the second kind of portability. It was never intended for the first. Nowadays, the market is totally dominated by hardware which support two's-complement 8, 16, 32, and 64-bit types without padding, where all pointers are ranked, where integer arithmetic naturally supports partially-indeterminate-value semantics on overflow, etc. and most programs will never need to run on platforms without those characteristics. Further, although C was designed in an era in which most programs were never expected to receive maliciously-crafted inputs,...
Aug
23
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
@Muzer: There are two ways a language can be portable: (1) The language requires platforms to implement consistent behaviors independent of the platform upon which it is running; Java, for example, requires that int be 32 bits, long 64 bits, and that integer shifts be performed mod 32 and long shifts mod 64; (2) Features of the language (e.g. the size of int, overflow semantics, etc.) vary by platform, such that compilers for the language can avoid having to generate inefficient code to emulate behaviors which the hardware doesn't support well, and which programmers...
Aug
22
comment Strict pointer aliasing: is access through a 'volatile' pointer/reference a solution?
The behavior of volatile accesses is Implementation-Defined, as such it may be possible for an implementation to define behavior in such a way that it would not guard against aliasing-related UB. A compiler written by sane mature individuals should have no problem writing and reading a volatile location using different types. Alas, some compiler writers would rather seek out excuses for treating something as Undefined Behavior than generate useful code.
Aug
22
comment How can memory mapped multi-byte registers be accessed without violating the strict aliasing rule?
Would volatile lvalues be exempt from the Strict Aliasing rule, on the grounds that a compiler is required to perform all accesses of volatile-qualified lvalues in sequence? Given int p; short *q=(short*)&p, a compiler would have the right to expect that a write to *q` would not affect p. If, however, both p and *q were volatile-qualified, I would expect that the compiler would never be entitled to assume that anything wouldn't affect p or *q.
Aug
22
comment Is the behaviour of the compiler undefined, with Undefined Behaviour?
Some compilers, if given a #include file whose last line is not properly terminated, will concatenate the line following the #include directive and process the result as a single line. It's possible some code takes advantage of that, and the authors of the Standard didn't want to break any such code. Rather than try to list all the ways compilers might interpret such things (e.g. does end-of-file count as whitespace, what should be the expansion of a FILE or LINE macro at the very end of a file, etc.) the authors of the Standard simply let compiler writers supply their own rules.
Aug
22
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
...disarm_missiles() will always return without exiting or hanging, could replace it with should_arm_missiles(); arm_missiles(); should_really_launch_missiles(); launch_missiles();, on the basis that if either test returns false behavior will be undefined. If the UB after the original code were to randomize RAM and registers, it might cause execution to go directly to launch_missiles(), but an external hardware interlock would prevent launch when not armed. If execution had gone to arm_missiles(), the should_really_launch_missiles() check would likewise have prevented launch.
Aug
22
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
@nyuszika7h: That would be benign compared with the kinds of optimizers some compilers writers favor. On a Harvard-architecture machine with runs code from ROM, one would think the worst imaginable consequence of Undefined Behavior would be to overwrite all RAM and registers with the most vexatious combination of values possible, but hyper-modern UB goes beyond that. Given if (should_launch_missiles()) { arm_missiles(); if (should_really_launch_missiles()) launch_missiles();} disarm_missiles();, a compiler which can determine that UB will occur following that code, and that...
Aug
22
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
...but define unsigned-to-signed casts as yielding 32767 for all unsigned values 32768 and up.
Aug
22
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
...efficient. If the programmer would be perfectly happy with l1 and l2 holding any values congruent to 32768 mod 65536, and doesn't care if they match, I see little purpose to requiring the programmer to add clutter the source code with language which makes the function harder to read (incidentally, even if i were type int16_t, I'm not sure if the Standard would guarantee that the latter statement would work correctly if invoked with negative values, since it would from what I can tell be legal [though odd] for a compiler to use two's-complement representations for negative numbers...
Aug
22
comment Does “Undefined Behavior” really permit *anything* to happen?
Given int i=INT_MAX; long l1,l2; i+=function_returning_one(); l1=i; second_function(); l2=i; I would not consider it "surprising" for l1 to yield INT_MAX+1u and l2 to yield -INT_MAX-1; indeed, on many DSPs such behavior would be a likely result (the compiler would add 16-bit value i to a 32-bit accumulator, store the result in both i and l2, call second_function();, load i (16 bits), and store it to l2. Writing the code as i=(int)((unsigned)i+function_returning_one()); would cause l1 and l2 to yield -INT_MAX-1, but would make the code less readable and less...