25,762 reputation
13358
bio website
location Illinois
age 44
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen 15 hours ago

Aug
10
answered PriorityLock in .NET
Aug
9
comment Is this a valid pattern for raising events in C#?
@Steve Cooper: One major problem with your code is that you will not only swallow not only a NullReferenceException resulting from handler unexpectedly becoming null, but also any NullReferenceException that occurs within the execution of Handler itself.
Aug
9
comment ReaderWriterLockSection: A bad idea?
If something bad happens by code that holds a writer-lock, I can understand presuming that the resource being protected might be in a bad state. But how could a holder of a reader lock corrupt the state of the shared resource?
Aug
9
comment Lock statement vs Monitor.Enter method
I wonder if .net will ever provide an equivalent for the creation of IDisposable objects (e.g. have the object under construction store itself in a byref parameter, so that if the constructor throws an exception the partially-constructed object can be Disposed (naturally, the Dispose would have to be aware that the object might not be fully constructed, but in many cases that shouldn't be too hard).
Aug
9
answered How thread safe are immutable objects?
Aug
9
comment When to use value and reference types for immutable types? (.NET)
I personally happen to believe that the disdain for mutable value types is largely an unfortunate consequence of some limitations and quirks in .net's handling of them, and that in many cases the way to achieve the best semantics and performance is to pass mutable value types by reference.
Aug
9
comment When to use value and reference types for immutable types? (.NET)
If a type is immutable, copying a reference and copying a value will be semantically identical. Unless the immutable type needs to have an inheritance relation with some other class (which is, to be sure, a useful pattern), the primary differences between an immutable value type and an immutable class type will relate to performance. The primary question should be whether it's better to create a separate heap object for every different instance of the type, but possibly share instances known to be identical, or avoid creating heap objects to hold the instances.
Aug
9
comment When to use value and reference types for immutable types? (.NET)
Value types are always stored within in the variable or field that represents them, wherever that variable or field happens to be stored. Reference-type objects are never stored actually within the variable or field that represents them; they are always stored elsewhere on the heap. If I have an object Foo1 of some class which contains a non-null field Bar1 of some reference type, then Foo1 and Bar1 are separate heap objects. If I have an object Foo2 of some class which contains a Bar2 of a value type, then Bar2 will be stored within heap object Foo2.
Aug
9
comment Is GC.SuppressFinalize guaranteed?
Is there any reason that code couldn't call CloseHandle twice on the same handle if an object gets queued for finalization while a resurrection-tracking WeakReference exists, and that WeakReference is converted back to a strong reference which gets .Dispose'd at just the right time? I'd be inclined to use IInterlocked.Exchange or Interlocked.CompareExchange when dealing with disposal flags to avoid that.
Aug
9
comment Costs involved with C# destructors (aka: finalizers)?
Very few classes should have finalizers. Indeed, with rare exceptions, only classes whose primary purpose centers around finalization should have them. Unmanaged resources (responsibilities) that would require finalization should not be held by classes that hold other things; each should be moved into classes whose primary purpose is to hold it and ensure its cleanup (ensure its responsibilities get carried out). Since everything that's referred to directly or indirectly by a finalizable object must be kept until the finalizer runs, finalizable classes should be as lightweight as possible.
Aug
9
comment Finalizers and destructors, what's Wikipedia saying?
They're not quite the same thing. A destructor for a class is a block of code which will request that the compiler generate an override of Object.Finalize() (i.e. a finalizer) containing the indicated code plus a call to Base.Finalize(). I'll confess to some puzzlement as to why C# goes out of its way not to allow one to simply override Finalize() or call Base.Finalize().
Aug
9
comment What do I do When Dispose Method Fails?
I've done this with a problematic USB device, using a TCP connection on a loopback address (.net 2.0). I think there are nicer ways in later .net versions, but the USB approach does work.
Aug
8
comment Type parameter constraints for the liskov principle in C#.NET
Incidentally, I would suggest that you mark the type T as covariant (put the word "out" before it) and also either add a read-only property "T self", or else define an interface ISelf<T> with a read-only property "T self". Note that T should not be constrained to be ICloneable<T> nor ISelf<T>. If you do this, one can have classes Foo and DerivedFoo with no public clone method, and classes CloneableFoo and CloneableDerivedFoo which derive from those, and accept any cloneable derivative of Foo as an ICloneable<Foo>, even though such cloneable derivatives share no common base class.
Aug
8
comment Why can't we use sealed classes as generic constraints?
Incidentally, if a class has two generic type parameters, one of which inherits from the other, it's perfectly acceptable for both parameters to be the same sealed class. Even though the fact that the second parameter is a sealed class would imply that the first parameter must be the same sealed class, there's no compiler complaint. I think the basic reason for the complaint was to encourage people not to use generic type parameters which could only ever be one type.
Aug
8
answered using static methods of a constrained generic type C#
Aug
8
comment Why does Bitmap cause rule CA2000, but Image does not?
The Dispose handler for such an object would have to be prepared for the possibility that the object wasn't fully constructed, but constructors could be far more robust. BTW, I'd also like to see a 'using out' construct which would specify that the object being guarded should have Dispose called if an exception is thrown, but not if the 'using out' block runs to completion.
Aug
8
comment Why does Bitmap cause rule CA2000, but Image does not?
Among other things, how aggressive should the scanner be in requiring that code which creates an IDisposable for the purpose of handing it off go to great lengths to ensure it's disposal in the face of exceptions? Saying "thing = new DisposableType1(new DisposableType2());" creates the possibility of leaking a DisposableType2() if the outer constructor throws an exception, but the code to handle that scenario is really icky and poses its own issues. What would have been best would have been if a constructor that threw an exception could expose the partially-constructed object.
Aug
8
comment Why does Bitmap cause rule CA2000, but Image does not?
If the scanner could see the code for the factories, it could probably determine that they create and return new IDisposable instances. Not all factories have code that would be accessible to the scanner, though. Adding recognition of factories would make the scanner generate more useful warnings, but also more spurious ones, unless it could also recognize when IDisposable objects are legitimately handed off; such recognition would raise a number of tricky issues, though....
Aug
8
answered Intercepting an exception inside IDisposable.Dispose
Aug
8
comment Why does Bitmap cause rule CA2000, but Image does not?
Is there any way such a rule change could me made really useful without going back and tagging a lot of methods with attributes indicating that they should be regarded as taking over, relinquishing, or fudging ownership of an IDisposable (i.e. varying behavior depending upon factors a the tool shouldn't be expected to track)? Introducing such behavior may be worthwhile, but adding enough tags to get clean reports could be a lot of work.